Anaheim, CA (Jan 19, 2012) -- Earthquaker Devices introduces two new pedals at winter NAMM 2012. Organizer The Organizer is a polyphonic organ emulator with controls for octave up,

Anaheim, CA (Jan 19, 2012) -- Earthquaker Devices introduces two new pedals at winter NAMM 2012.

Organizer
The Organizer is a polyphonic organ emulator with controls for octave up, octave down, choir, direct signal, lag and tone. Like the Rainbow Machine, it uses a mix of analog and DSP circuitry with true bypass switching. The organizer has a warm and very analog feel with a hint of Leslie warble that is unlike other modern octave shifters. It tracks all over the neck on both guitar and bass on both notes as well as chords. The unique choir control takes a blend of the octave up, octave down and direct signal to give you an additional octave up, +2 octaves up, octave down, +2 octaves down and direct feed with a roomy delay.

Controls:
  • Octave up (polyphonic octave up level
  • Octave down (polyphonic octave down level)
  • Choir (multi octave voice)
  • Direct (analog direct signal level)
  • Tone (LP filter)
  • Lag (delay between the wet and dry signal)

The Organizer will be available for $185.00 in March 2012.

Tone Job
The tone job is an all analog active guitar and bass EQ and booster with a small foot print. It was designed to

be subtle yet highly effective while dialing in all the right frequencies. It was tuned by ear using a number of different guitar and amp combinations with the goal of delivering booming low end, chiming highs and cutting mids without being overbearing like most guitar oriented EQ’s on the market. Controls:
  • Level (boost control)
  • Bass
  • Middle
  • Treble

The Tone Job will be available for $165.00 in June 2012.

For more information:
www.earthquakerdevices.com

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