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NY Amp Show: Nolatone Rotten Johnny,Black Tooth 50

PG's Shawn Hammond is On Location at the 2010 NY Amp Show where he visits the Nolatone Amps room. In this segment, we get to check out two of their newest amps--the Rotten Johnny and the Black Tooth 50 prototype head. The Rotten Johnny has two 6V6 (EL84s available upon request) power tubes, two 12AX7 or ECC83 preamp tubes, a Mercury Magnetics transformer, and a 12" 25 watt Warehouse Speaker Green Beret. The Black Tooth 50 prototype was literally built a few days before the show. It is the big brother preamp to what is housed currently in the Rotten Johnny. Nolatone's Paul Sanders said he's looking to fill a whole line of Black Tooth heads, including 18W, 22W, 30W, 50W, and 100W. Two noteworthy controls on the prototype are the Stripper Gain and Girlfriend Gain—you'll have to check out our upcoming demo to hear what those sound like.



PG's Shawn Hammond is On Location at the 2010 NY Amp Show where he visits the Nolatone Amps room. In this segment, we get to check out two of their newest amps--the Rotten Johnny and the Black Tooth 50 prototype head.

The Rotten Johnny has two 6V6 (EL84s available upon request) power tubes, two 12AX7 or ECC83 preamp tubes, a Mercury Magnetics transformer, and a 12" 25 watt Warehouse Speaker Green Beret.

The Black Tooth 50 prototype was literally built a few days before the show. It is the big brother preamp to what is housed currently in the Rotten Johnny. Nolatone's Paul Sanders said he's looking to fill a whole line of Black Tooth heads, including 18W, 22W, 30W, 50W, and 100W. Two noteworthy controls on the prototype are the Stripper Gain and Girlfriend Gain—you'll have to check out our upcoming demo to hear what those sound like.

While Annie Clark was named the 26th greatest guitarist of all time by Rolling Stone in 2023, she couldn’t care less about impressing an athletic stamp on either her sound or her image.


Photo by Alex Da Corte

On her eighth studio release, the electroacoustic art-rock guitarist and producer animates an extension of the strange and singular voice she’s been honing since her debut in 2007.

“Did you grow up Unitarian?” Annie Clark asks me. We’re sitting in a control room at Electric Lady Studios in New York’s West Village, and I’ve just explained my personal belief system to her, to see if Clark, aka St. Vincent, might relate and return the favor. After all, does she not possess a kind of sainthood worth inquiring about?

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As he approaches his 80th year, Chris Smither remains a potent songwriter and guitarist whose work is truly timeless—carved from experience and a deep perspective into the human condition.

Photo by Jo Chattman

The veteran fingerstylist and songwriter—who’s had his songs covered by Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris, and others—ponders the existential while celebrating the earthly. He also talks about the trajectory of his six-decades-long career, and how he learned to stop doing what’s unnecessary.

Now well into his sixth decade as a performer, with more than 20 albums behind him, singer-songwriter Chris Smither is doing some of his finest work. His vivid lyrics and resonant baritone on his new recording, All About the Bones, are elevated by his inimitable guitar style.

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Name: Steve Bloom

Hometown: New York, NY

Guitar: The Pinecaster P-90


Reader and NYC musician Steve Bloom wanted a pine-bodied Tele with P-90s and 4-way switching, so he built the Pinecaster.

With a yen for a pine-bodied 6-string with a diverse array of tones, Steve Bloom built a parts guitar that‘s more than the sum of its parts.

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“Bill Bass” Nelson’s playing on Fred Wesley’s Say Blow by Blow Backwards is distinct from that of his other P-Funk bassmates.

When columnist Bill Leigh played bass behind trombonist Fred Wesley, he got an up-close look at how P-Funk bassists helped define a sound.

Most of us are continually working to broaden our bass skills, from fretboard familiarity and technical mastery to specific musical competencies, like bass-line construction and development, walking, and soloing. Along the way, we may try to incorporate the tone and techniques of specific bassists into our playing, sometimes while learning their parts from songs they played on.

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