Gittler Instruments Introduces the Gittler Guitar

By paring the instrument down to its most essential elements, the Gittler Guitar remains uniquely capable of exhibiting nuances that were previously unrealized by guitar players.

Islandia, NY (October 9, 2012) – Gittler Instruments, LLC announces its launch of the newly designed Gittler Guitar, invented in the 1970s by musician and minimalist design pioneer Allan Gittler. With only 60 models released in the 1980s, the guitar has become a symbol of think-forward design.

Allan Gittler was a musical visionary who aimed to dispel the common misconceptions which have been embraced by guitar players dating back to the 1930s. He was able to banish all traditional notions of what a guitar “should” be, by methodically stripping away all that was unnecessary and redundant. By paring the instrument down to its most essential elements, the Gittler Guitar remains uniquely capable of exhibiting nuances that were previously unrealized by guitar players.

Featured in the New York Museum of Modern Art and Boston Fine Arts Museum, the instrument, consisting of 31 frets, is a striking minimalist design incorporating rounded cylindrical and ergonomic features. The newly improved Gittler guitar is made of aircraft grade Titanium and boasts a long list of exciting features that were either unavailable or unrealized up until now, including:

• Electronics box (Ebox)
• Six individual pickups of revolutionary design
• Hexaphonic output capability
• Patented locking string mechanism
• Abrasion resistant Titanium construction
• Active electronics and tone shaping circuit
• LED fret marker lighting
• Adjustable bridge
• Strap anchor points and adjustable bout
• Optional LOXX strap lock system
• Deluxe version in gun-metal finish with Aerospace Teflon coating

The Gittler Guitar will be introduced to the market at NAMM 2013.

For more information:
www.gittlerinstruments.com

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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