The Icon guitars are the first set-neck guitars in Godin Guitars'' line-up, and feature HDR electronics that allow the player to go from passive to active.

Montreal, Canada (June 10, 2010) -- Godin Guitars' new Icon series includes four models: the Icon Type 2 Fat Black, Icon Type 2 Classic, Icon Type 2 Convertible, and the Icon Type 3.


All four models features a chambered solid mahogany body with carved mahogany top, mahogany set-neck, 24 3/4" scale, 16" radius, ebony fingerboard with 22 frets, Graphtech ResoMax bridge and the Godin High-Definition Revoicer.

The H.D.R. High-Definition Revoicer increases and revoices the frequency range of each pickup and lets the player go from passive to active pickups with the push of a button.

Icon Type 2 Fat Black specs:
  • Electronics: 2x humbuckers (neck: Godin GHN1 / bridge: Seymour Duncan ‘59), 5-way switch, 1x Godin High-Definition Revoicer, 1x volume, 1x tone
  • Colors: Black HG
  • Pickups: no covers / black rings
Icon Type 2 Classic specs:
  • Electronics: 2x chrome humbuckers (neck: Godin GHN1 / bridge: Seymour Duncan ‘59), 5-way switch, 1x Godin High-Definition Revoicer, 1x volume, 1x tone
  • Colors: Natural HG, Burgundy HG
  • Pickups: chrome covers / cream rings
Icon Type 2 Convertible specs:
  • Electronics: 2x Seymour Duncan P-Rail pickups, 3-way switch, 2x mini switches for pickup selection (humbucker/single-coil/P90), 1x Godin High-Definition Revoicer, 1x volume, 1x tone
  • Colors: Natural HG, Sunburst HG
  • Pickups: cream covers / black rings
Icon Type 3 specs:
  • Electronics: 3x Lollar P90 single coil pickups, 5-way switch, 1x Godin High-Definition Revoicer, 1x volume, 1x tone
  • Colors: Burgundy HG, Natural HG, Black HG
  • Pickups signed on back by Jason Lollar
For more information:
Godin Guitars

Equipped with noise reduction and noise gate modes, the Integrated Gate has a signal monitoring function that constantly monitors the input signal.

Read MoreShow less

A blind horse wouldn’t be impressed, but this beautiful, double-horned instrument with one-of-a-kind engravings helped make luthier Tony Zemaitis famous.

Though they never reached the commercial success of some of their peers, the Faces have no doubt earned a place as one of the seminal rock ’n’ roll bands of the late ’60s and early ’70s. Combining influences as varied as instrumental funk à la the Meters, traditional folk music, and a heavy dose of rhythm and blues, the Faces brand of rock ’n’ roll can be heard in some way or another in the music of countless bands that followed. After the Faces folded in 1975, all five members went on to continue making great music, but their chemistry together was undeniable.

Read MoreShow less

Oh no—it finally happened! Now the big question: How long before my verve for guitar recovers from Covid?

This past Sunday I awoke to a very un-Sunday sensation. Hovering on the edge of consciousness, as yet still incapable of contemplating what Sunday mornings are for (lounging in bed till coffee’s made and lunch plans are set, of course!), I was suddenly struck by a godawful stench. As one does, I wrinkled up my nose, lifted my head to look around in disgust, and took a couple more sniffs to see if … I don’t know—maybe I’d dreamt it? Or woke up incontinent? Then I tasted the putrescence. Then … nothing.

Fuuuuuuuck.

Read MoreShow less
x