Six flavors of Big Muff-style fuzz without any digital signal processing or digital emulation.

Kansas City, MO (September 16, 2015) -- JHS Pedals has launched the new Muffuletta fuzz pedal, a tribute to the legend and story of one of the greatest pedals ever invented.

The Muffuletta replicates five classic Big Muff circuits from years gone by as well as a new and original JHS version for a total of six Muff models. All executed without any digital signal processing or digital emulation. When you choose a model, you are achieving analog tone that uses real components and values found in the original units. We have selected our favorite classic versions from the pages of history and made them available in one small format pedal that is easy to understand, operate and do what it should do… replicate rare, expensive, mythical and sought after versions of this circuit with ease.

The pedal features four controls: Volume, Tone, Sustain and Mode. The “Volume" control works just like any other volume control allowing you to adjust the overall output of the pedal to your taste. The “Tone” control lets you brighten or darken your overall tone. The “Sustain” control is best understood as a gain or distortion control as it gives more distortion to the circuit. The “Mode” control lets you choose from our six different versions of the Big Muff on the fly. Looking at the “Mode” control you will see six icons around the lower 50% of the knob. Here’s a quick description of the six modes:

  • JHS - "2015" The JHS Muff is a JHS original take on the classic circuit. You will find this version more powerful, less compressed with a more haunting midrange. It is also the best for bass guitar.
  • 73 Rams Head – Scooped midrange, less gain, and overall darker tone.
  • The Triangle – More low end and more articulate.
  • The Pi – Best known for more aggressive sound.
  • The Russian – Less clarity, less low end.
  • The Civil War – More midrange, brighter overall tone, and less gain.

"I want to give a massive thank you to my good friend Jon Cusack and Cusack Music for helping this hefty idea be fully realized. Jon you are a wizard of circuitry and a deep well of design knowledge to the things that are over my head,” says JHS Pedals’ Josh Scott.

The Muffuletta pedal is priced at $229 and is available now.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
JHS Pedals

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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