New HD amp modeling technology delivers previously unachievable realism in tone and feel

Click here to watch our video demo of the POD HD400.
Calabasas, CA
(September 30, 2010) — Line 6, Inc., the industry leader in digital modeling technology for music-creation products, ships a family of new POD HD multi-effect pedals, which debuts 16 brand-new Line 6 HD amp models, and much more.


POD HD500 - Larger Image

“HD amp models deliver sonic depth, character and realism like never before,” remarked Mike Murphy, Category Manager for POD and PC Products at Line 6. “Over the last few years, we’ve had teams working on assembling a museum-quality collection of vintage guitar amps, restoring each amp back to its pristine state, and developing new HD amp modeling technology. The result is a collection of amp models that far exceeds our expectations and is the biggest news in POD since POD itself.”



The 16 HD amp models offer an incredibly wide array of amp tones, and they do so with previously unachievable realism. They are inspired by* a variety of immortal modern and vintage guitar amplifiers including a Fender® Twin Reverb®, Hiwatt® Custom 100, Supro® S6616, Gibson® EH-185, Divided by 13 JRT 9/15, Dr. Z® Route 66, Vox® AC-30 (Top Boost), Marshall® JTM-45 MkII, Park 75, Mesa/Boogie® Dual Rectifier®, ENGL® Fireball 100, and more. (Recognizable amplifiers modeled for previous POD products have been re-modeled for POD HD using the new HD amp modeling technology.)

In the largest research project ever undertaken by Line 6, the HD Amp Modeling campaign required the development of an entirely new suite of software and hardware tools. These tools were built to capture, analyze, and translate into DSP code every nuance that analog circuitry imparts to the creation of an amplified guitar tone.

POD HD500, the flagship of the three-product family, features a comprehensive collection of digital and analog ins and outs, a 48-second looper, and over 100 M-class effects. Made popular by the Line 6 M13 and M9 Stompbox Modelers, M-class effects excel at everything from vintage fuzz to modern pitch effects. Modeled after classic stompboxes and rack gear, or custom-designed by Line 6, M-class effects include tangy choruses, syrupy sweet reverbs, distinctive delays, and much more.

POD HD500’s back panel includes quarter-inch balanced and XLR unbalanced outputs, XLR mic input, stereo FX send and return, MIDI in and out/thru, S/PDIF and more. PODHD300 and POD HD400 feature full sets of ins and outs, a 24-second looper, and more than 80 and 90 M-class effects, respectively.


POD HD300 - $459.99 MSRP
POD HD400 - $559.99 MSRP
POD HD500 - $699.99 MSRP

For more information:
line6.com/podhd

All product names used herein are trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Line 6. These trademarks of other manufacturers are used solely to identify the products of those manufacturers whose tones and sounds were studied during Line 6’s sound model development. Fender and Twin Reverb are registered trademarks of Fender Musical Instruments Corporation. Hiwatt is a registered trademark of Fernandes Company Ltd. Supro is a registered trademark of Zinky Electronics, LLC. Gibson is a registered trademark of Gibson Guitar Corp. Dr. Z is a registered trademark of Dr. Z Amps, Inc. Vox is a registered trademark of Vox R&D Limited. Marshall is a registered trademark of Marshall Amplification Plc. Mesa/Boogie and Rectifier are registered trademarks of Mesa/Boogie Ltd. Engl is a registered trademark of Ausflug, Beate and Engl, Edmund.

Source: Press Release

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