The Danish guitar pedal company presents an upgraded version of their flagship clean boost.

Copenhagen, Denmark (June 1, 2018) -- The Danish guitar pedal company that has established itself as an expert in analog overdrive pedals now gives its previous boost pedal, The Pusher, a significant upgrade.

The Pusher has been very successful for the company, yet one wish from guitarists has been to not only being able to push their tone to the edge of the cliff, but beyond and off the cliff. With this valuable feedback from the field, Lunastone set out to meet this demand.

The new Boost 18 that shares the same small footprint and flavorful tone of its predecessor. The Pusher offered 15 dB of clean boost, and as the name suggests Boost 18 adds another three clicks to the table with its 18 dB of clean boost.

“Boost 18 will deliver even more clean boost than The Pusher did, but of course it has the same sonic flavor,” says Steen Grøntved, founder and Head Engineer of Lunastone Pedals. “Why would we change its ‘personality? Every guitarist we have heard back from loved the sound of the pedal, but some of them could use just a little more juice.

Well, we hard you and that is exactly what we have maneged to cram into Boost 18: The same non-transparent tone. I have deliberately tweaked it to add flavor, and as a result we have seen many players who actually uses The Pusher as an always-on preamp pedal, simply because they love the natural tube-like sound of it. Now they can continue to do so with Boost 18, but also get an additional kick when using it for boosting.”

Simultaneously with the launch of Boost 18, The Pusher will be discontinued.

$109 / €109

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
LunaStone

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Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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