Fender Releases the Duel Pugilist Distortion and Dual Marine Layer Reverb


Introducing The Dual Pugilist Distortion Pedal | Effects Pedals | Fender

Duel Pugilist Distortion ($229.99 USD, £179.99 GBP, €199.99 EUR, $499 AUD, ¥27,500 JPY)

Step into the ring with this one-two punch distortion pedal. The Duel Pugilist features the same distortion voicings found in our popular Pugilist pedal, but with new combinations designed for a knockout. The Duel Pugilist offers three operating modes: Series, Mute and Parallel. Series mode allows stacking the two distortions as you would with two separate pedals, while Bypass mode allows blending two different distortions, or a clean sound with a distorted sound. Mute mode offers the ability to use one distortion to create your main tone and then layer an additional distortion sound on top for added richness and complexity. Also features an added 2-band master shelving EQ. Designed by Fender's in-house tone gurus, the Duel Pugilist is an all-original Fender circuit. The chassis is crafted from lightweight, durable anodized aluminum and the LED-backlit knobs show your control settings on a dark stage at a glance.

Introducing The Dual Marine Layer Reverb Pedal | Effects Pedals | Fender

Dual Marine Layer Reverb ($229.99 USD, £194.99 GBP, €219.99 EUR, $499 AUD, ¥27,500 JPY)

Fender and Reverb – name a more iconic musical duo. Fender's Dual Marine Layer allows you to add even more dimension to your sonic arsenal. Featuring two independent footswitchable settings, three unique reverb algorithms allow the user to create multiple soundscapes. The sustain switch generates massive atmospheric creations for an out-of-this-world tonal experience. Designed by Fender's in-house tone gurus, the Dual Marine Layer is an all-original Fender circuit. The chassis is crafted from lightweight, durable anodized aluminum and the LED-backlit knobs show your control settings on a dark stage at a glance.

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