1965 Fender Stratocaster # 104234

Get a sneak peek at this rare 1965 Sonic Blue Strat

Guitar collectors consider 1965 to be one of the most significant years in history. It was the year that the large corporation, Columbia Broadcasting Systems Inc. (CBS), bought Fender Instruments and Fender Sales. To many players and collectors this year also marks the beginning of a decline in the quality of Fender products that continued through the 1970s.

The Stratocaster had been gradually evolving, along with the rest of the Fender line, since its debut in 1954. The most obvious change occurred in 1959 when the one-piece maple neck acquired a separate rosewood fingerboard. After the CBS buyout, more changes took place, the most dramatic being the enlargement of the headstock shape (coinciding with the popularity of bell-bottoms?) in December of 1965.

The rare 1965 Sonic Blue Strat featured this month has details common to Strats made during this transitional period. The November 1965 neck date shows that this is one of the last small headstock Strats made until the 1980s. Other traits include Gold Transition Logo (designed by Fender photographer Bob Perine), pearloid position markers, double line Kluson Deluxe tuners and an “F” stamp neck plate. This guitar also came stocked from the factory with large frets (often seen in 1965).

More detailed information about Fender Stratocasters can be found in The Fender Stratocaster by A. R. Duchossoir, and The Stratocaster Chronicles by Tom Wheeler.





Dave''s Guitar Shop
Daves Roger’s Collection Is tended to by Laun Braithwaite & Tim Mullally
All photos credit Tim Mullally
Dave’s Collection is on dispay at:
Dave''s Guitar Shop
1227 Third Street South
La Crosse, WI 54601
608-785-7704
davesguitar.com

A compact pedal format preamp designed to offer classic, natural bass tone with increased tonal control and extended headroom.

Read MoreShow less

In their corner, from left to right: Wilco’s Pat Sansone (guitars, keys, and more), drummer Glenn Kotche, Jeff Tweedy, bassist John Stirratt, guitarist Nels Cline, and keyboardist Mikael Jorgensen.

Photo by Annabel Merhen

How Jeff Tweedy, Nels Cline, and Pat Sansone parlayed a songwriting hot streak, collective arrangements, live ensemble recording, and twangy tradition into the band’s new “American music album about America.”

Every artist who’s enjoyed some level of fame has had to deal with the parasocial effect—where audiences feel an overly intimate connection to an artist just from listening to their music. It can lead some listeners to believe they even have a personal relationship with the artist. I asked Jeff Tweedy what it feels like to be on the receiving end of that.

Read MoreShow less

Luthier Maegen Wells recalls the moment she fell in love with the archtop and how it changed her world.

The archtop guitar is one of the greatest loves of my life, and over time it’s become clear that our tale is perhaps an unlikely one. I showed up late to the archtop party, and it took a while to realize our pairing was atypical. I had no idea that I had fallen head-over-heels in love with everything about what’s commonly perceived as a “jazz guitar.” No clue whatsoever. And, to be honest, I kind of miss those days. But one can only hear the question, “Why do you want to build jazz guitars if you don’t play jazz?” so many times before starting to wonder what the hell everyone’s talking about.

Read MoreShow less
x