Pro Tone Pedals Introduces the Dead Horse Overdrive MKIII

The third iteration features a more bass friendly curve for the 7- and 8-string players.

Charleston, SC (September 10, 2015) -- Pro Tone Pedals has just introduced the 3rd iteration of its flagship product, The Dead Horse Overdrive MKIII. With unrivaled tone and flexibility, it’s been called the best overdrive for modern metal guitar tones on the market today.

In 2007, Dead Horse Overdrive was Pro Tone Pedals’ entry into the Tube Screamer clone space. They modified the classic TS design to their liking, gave it a tongue in cheek name, and with its huge success has evolved to this 3rd iteration.

Now you can dial in the classic Dead Horse response, the traditional mid hump of the TS line, a more bass friendly curve for the 7 and 8-string players, or even the extreme bass cut found on their Attack Overdrive.

Most notable to this new version is the addition of the 6-way Bass Frequency selection switch, which, combined with the Bass foot switch, offers a total of seven different settings to dial in the ‘voice’ of the overdrive.

A question that comes to mind is why a switch, why not a sweeping knob? According to Dennis Mollan, founder of Pro Tone Pedals, “Performing a clean sweep would require adding more components to the audio path, which detracts from the overall voice of the pedal. Consider all the Screamer clones that added active EQs and have come and gone from the market. The reason they fail is that the active EQ destroys the tonal character players have come to know and trust. To cure this, we have seven frequency roll-off settings that require almost zero additional components to gum up your tone.”

For more information:
Pro Tone Pedals

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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