Providence Introduces the Vitalizer BF VZF-1

An active impedance converter specifically designed for bass guitars.

North Hollywood, CA (March 11, 2016) -- Providence has introduced a new Active Impedance Converter for bass guitars, Vitalizer BF VZF-1.

The Vitalizer is one of the buffers that converts high impedance signal that are more likely to degrade the sound quality by picking up noise or losing higher frequency sound while going through the wiring and electric circuits to low impedance signal that are less likely to be affected by those problems.

It is an Active Impedance Converter that Providence has applied original invention to make sure the sound doesn't get too Hi-Fi while respecting guitars and effect pedals' character of sound signals. It delivers natural faithful instrument sound by using a special circuit that minimizes the "Active" sound.

By placing it on the closest spot from guitar/bass in the signal chain, the Vitalizer BF tightens the bottom end that is tend to be blurred with bass, 7/8 string guitar, and drop tuned guitar. Also, it will help prevent degrading the signal or tonal change and reduces the noise from different environmental situations when the pedal is placed in the beginning of the signal chain of the pedalboard. Moreover, it works great even before the amp or where the player feels the signal gets degraded or causes tonal change.

The Vitalizer BF is in a small chassis (60x73/mm) to be placed in a small space on the pedalboard and helps prevent degrade the signal. It needs to be used with external power supply when 9V battery is used. It also runs with AC adapter or power supply. The Vitalizer BF pedal carries street prices of $119.00. They will be available at select retailers, EMG Pickups and can also be purchased directly from Providence AMERICA’s online store

For more information:
Providence

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