Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

Seymour Duncan Announces Alex Skolnick Signature Humbuckers

Seymour Duncan Announces Alex Skolnick Signature Humbuckers

Seymour Duncan announces the Alex Skolnick Signature Humbuckers, Warren DeMartini RTM, Exciter and Little '78 pickups.


Alex Skolnick Signature Humbuckers

Emerging in the late '80s as the teenage prodigy of thrash metal legends Testament, Alex Skolnick immediately established himself as one of the genre’s premier guitarists. In 2002, after earning a degree from New School University, he crossed over into jazz with the Alex Skolnick Trio and numerous other instrumental collaborations.

Designed with Alex for his signature guitar, these humbuckers have been a popular Custom Shop made-to-order set. Both pickups complement the expressive melodies and aggressive palm muting that define his genre-spanning tone. The bridge pickup is wound hot and designed to emphasize midrange frequencies. The neck humbucker is lower output and vintage voiced to deliver an articulate counterbalance to the boldness of the bridge pickup.

Warren DeMartini RTM

​The driving force behind Ratt’s metal anthems like “Round and Round” and “Lay It Down”, Warren DeMartini quickly solidified his status as a best-in-class lead guitarist and songwriter. Recognized for his inventive and technically gifted guitar work, his multi-platinum songs set the bar high for aspiring players as the band churned out hit after hit and dominated radio and TV in the 1980s.

The Warren DeMartini RTM ("Rattus Tonius Maximus") is a high-output bridge humbucker with an Alnico 2 magnet. It was designed to produce aggressive and balanced tones that complement the complex chord voicings and precision solos Warren is known for.

Exciter

​The Exciter bridge humbucker, based on the highly sought-after tone from the early 80s, is designed to harken back to the era's signature sound. Loaded with a high-output Ceramic magnet, The Exciter is voiced to deliver powerful dimensions, bold harmonics, and firepower that define the glam rock's heyday. Roll back the volume a bit and the tone is transparent enough for classic slightly gritty tones.

Little '78

Sometime in '78, Eddie Van Halen gave Seymour Duncan a P.A.F. to experiment with, along with instructions to rewind it with the intent to enhance the reproduction of artificial harmonics and “hot wind” a little for some extra “juice”.

The Little '78 Strat is the single-coil version of that experiment. The magnet and output combination lends itself to a warm crunch with biting leads and overtone-laden tapped runs. While this was not the final destination for Eddie, it offers players the opportunity to revisit a waypoint in the early days of his legendary pursuit of the ultimate tone.

If you’re a player who demands a high-performance tone the Little '78 Strat just may be your ticket.

For more information, please visit seymourduncan.com.

Steve Carr’s first amp build was a Fender Champ clone. It didn’t work on the first try. Luckily, that didn’t stop him.

Photo by Charles Odell

The North Carolina amp builder is famous for his circuit-blending soundboxes, like the Rambler, Sportsman, and Telstar. Here, he tells us how he got started and what keeps him pushing forward.

Steve Carr started building amps because he loved playing guitar. He and his friends cobbled together a band in Michigan City, Indiana, in high school in the mid-’70s, and the gear they played with seemed like a black box. In the pre-internet days, getting information on amp voicings and pickup magnets was difficult. Carr was fascinated, and always wanted to know what made things tick.

Read MoreShow less

Yungblud's first signature features a mahogany body, P-90 Pro pickup, and SlimTaper C profile neck.

Read MoreShow less

On this season finale episode, the actor and musician leads a Prine-inspired songwriting session about how few tools we have in our collective toolbox.

Read MoreShow less

John Mayall in the late ’80s, in a promo shot for his Island Records years. During his carreer, he also recorded for the Decca (with the early Bluesbreakers lineups), Polydor, ABC, DJM, Silvertone, Eagle, and Forty Below labels.

He was dubbed “the father of British blues,” but Mayall’s influence was worldwide, and he nurtured some of the finest guitarists in the genre, including Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Harvey Mandel, Coco Montoya, and Walter Trout. Mayall died at his California home on Monday, at age 90.

John Mayall’s career spanned nearly 70 years, but it only took his first four albums to cement his legendary status. With his initial releases with his band the Bluesbreakers—1966’s Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton; ’67’s A Hard Road, with Peter Green on guitar; plus the same year’s Crusade, which showcased Mick Taylor—and his solo debut The Blues Alone, also from 1967, Mayall introduced an international audience of young white fans to the decidedly Black and decidedly American genre called blues. In the subsequent decades, he maintained an active touring and recording schedule until March 26, 2022, when he played his last gig at age 87. It was reported that he died peacefully, on Monday, in his California home, at 90.

Read MoreShow less