For years, Steve Harris of Iron Maiden has been using custom-spec P-Bass pickups built exclusively in the Seymour Duncan Custom Shop. The SPB-4 Steve Harris Signature model is the production version of that very same pickup.


Santa Barbara, CA (April 2, 2013) -- For years, Steve Harris of Iron Maiden has been using custom-spec P-Bass pickups built exclusively in the Seymour Duncan Custom Shop. The SPB-4 Steve Harris Signature model is the production version of that very same pickup. Road-tested by Steve Harris for more than a decade, the SPB-4 Steve Harris Signature Model P-Bass pickup has cemented itself as a permanent part of heavy metal history. The custom-spec vintage-hot coil windings (13k Ohms), and Alnico 5 rod magnets provide just the right combination of warmth and punch to compliment Steve’s distinctive two-fingered playing style. The hook-up consists of a standard two-wire P-Bass setup, and the covers feature both the Seymour Duncan logo and Steve’s signature logo.

Steve Harris is the man who founded Iron Maiden (and his new project, British Lion) and has served as one of the most influential metal bass players of all time, with a style of playing and tone that is truly unique. Kevin Beller, Vice President of Engineering at Seymour Duncan writes, “We worked to develop a pickup that could stay warm and deep, something that could fill up the mix without becoming boomy. The Steve Harris SPB-4 achieves this by finding the right balance between warmth, articulation and cut.”

Street: $79.95

For more information:
Seymour Duncan

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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