july 2009

Two sibling beauties from Schneider

These sibling archtops (not exactly twins, but definitely related) come from Cincinnati, OH, builder David Schneider. Both guitars are made with European spruce tops; the backs and sides are of German maple from the same tree. Fretboards, finger-rests, bridges and tailpiece are ebony. The pin bridge SoHo 16 is 16-1/2" at the lower bout, and the SoHo 17 (with tailpiece), is 17-3/8". Both are 25-3/8" scale with 1-3/4" bone nuts.

Schneider was mentored by Jimmy D’Aquisto before apprenticing with lute maker Lawrence Brown, with a final stint in India learning to build sitars. The wrap-around end clasp terracing on these guitars was inspired by one of Schneider’s lutes.

The headstocks are chambered and resonate, providing a slight stereo or echo effect. The bridges are glued on, and the guitar with the tailpiece features a string-through bridge, a technique the Cincinnati-based builder has also used on flat tops. The bracing system was adopted from D’Aquisto, the Circle of Sound. There are four K&K transducer pickups mounted inside the guitar on the bridgeplate, a system Schneider feels is more natural sounding than bridge saddle-mounted transducers.

schneiderguitars.com

 













 



 
















 






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