rolling stones

Name: Dana Welts

Hometown: The Berkshires, Massachusetts
Guitar: Custom Teardrop

A guitarist enlists his friend to build a teardrop guitar like the one he saw Brian Jones playing with the Rolling Stones in the early 1960s.

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With 1978’s Some Girls—one of the Stone’s biggest-selling studio albums—and its resulting US tour, the band reconnected with their gritty, groovin’, and brash roots.

The Rolling Stones
Some Girls Live in Texas '78
Eagle Rock Entertainment

During the mid ’70s, the Stones had lost much of their raunchy, charismatic zeal. They had released Goat’s Head Soup, It’s Only Rock ’n’ Roll, and Black and Blue—albums that were commercially successful, but tepidly received by critics who claimed the rockers had become stale and predictable compared to the punk and disco music that had taken over the airwaves. However, with 1978’s Some Girls—one of the Stone’s biggest-selling studio albums—and its resulting US tour, the band reconnected with their gritty, groovin’, and brash roots. Here again was the group that first swaggered out of London in the late ’60s and early ’70s, and the album’s songs and attitude restored the lads to their rightful place in rock ’n’ roll royalty. This rowdy energy powers the DVD and Blu-ray concert film Some Girls Live in Texas ’78.

The action starts with a burning cover of Chuck Berry’s “Let It Rock” and an equally overdriven rendition of Exile on Main St.’s “All Down the Line.” On the latter, Keith Richards uses a ’50s blonde Tele, although for most of the concert he relies on a black ’75 Telecaster Deluxe driving a Mesa/ Boogie Mark I. From there, Live in Texas offers up blistering takes on “Tumbling Dice,” “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” and “Star Star.” During the latter, Mick Jagger ad-libs “Jimmy Page is quite the rage, I couldn’t see the reason why.”

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PG's Joe Coffey is On Location at the 2010 LA Amp Show where he catches up with producer/engineer Andy Johns and guitarist Frank Infante. You may not know Andy Johns by name, but you probably have some of his work in your music collection. He's a prolific producer/engineer/mixer who has worked with such legendary acts like Led Zeppelin (Led Zeppelin's II, III, and IV), the Rolling Stones (Exile on Main St, Goats Head Soup, It's Only Rock 'n' Roll), Van Halen (For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge), and even produced Eric Johnson's new disc Up Close. Johns talks about working with guitarists, earning co-production credits for his 21st birthday from sir Eric Clapton, and what it takes to get good guitar tone. Guitarist Frank Infante has worked with Blondie and has just finished recording on the newest New York Dolls effort due out later in 2011. Infante talks about finding your tone, his favorite amps, and some of his signature signal chains from this days in Blondie.



PG's Joe Coffey is On Location at the 2010 LA Amp Show where he catches up with producer/engineer Andy Johns and guitarist Frank Infante.

You may not know Andy Johns by name, but you probably have some of his work in your music collection. He's a prolific producer/engineer/mixer who has worked with such legendary acts like Led Zeppelin (Led Zeppelin's II, III, and IV), the Rolling Stones (Exile on Main St, Goats Head Soup, It's Only Rock 'n' Roll), Van Halen (For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge), and even produced Eric Johnson's new disc Up Close. Johns talks about working with guitarists, earning co-production credits for his 21st birthday from sir Eric Clapton, and what it takes to get good guitar tone.

Guitarist Frank Infante has worked with Blondie and has just finished recording on the newest New York Dolls effort due out later in 2011. Infante talks about finding your tone, his favorite amps, and some of his signature signal chains from this days in Blondie.