Today's guitar stars Molly Tuttle, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Emily Wolfe, Charlie Starr, and others, fondly reminisce on the moment 6-string influences forever impacted their musical lives.

10. Josh Smith on Stevie Ray Vaughan's "Scuttle Buttin'"

The L.A.-based studio ace and blues hound sets the stage about how SRV's power punched him in the chest and forever changed his world.

Click to watch Josh's Rig Rundown.


 

9. Phil X on Led Zeppelin's "Black Dog"

The exuberant Bon Jovi lead guitarist goes back to the '70s when Page blew off his doors with slinky, nuanced playing and then performs a chunk of the song with bassist Daniel Spree and drummer Brian Tichy.

Click to watch Phil's Rig Rundown.


 

8. Emily Wolfe on the Eagles' "Life in the Fast Lane"

The badass Austin rocker retells how a Hotel California backdrop and washing the family car steered her to guitardom.

Click to watch Emily's Rig Rundown.


 

7. Kenny Wayne Shepherd on Jimi Hendrix's "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)"

The platinum-selling blues rocker highlights the Electric Ladyland hit's innovative wah work and swaggering groove.

Click to watch KWS' Rig Rundown.


 

6. Molly Tuttle on "Angeline the Baker"

The blazing bluegrass flatpicker recalls her dad introducing her to drop-D and how to use ringing chord notes around melodies via this old-time fiddle tune.

 

5. Lindsay Ell on Jimi Hendrix's "Purple Haze"

The Nashville country star and certified guitar dork remembers when mentor Randy Bachman showed her the quintessential "Hendrix chord."

Click to watch Lindsay's Rig Rundown.


 

4. G.E. Smith on Paul Butterfield Blues Band's "Shake Your Money-Maker" and The Rolling Stones' "The Last Time"

The former Saturday Night Live ringleader and Roger Waters sideman recalls how both Mike Bloomfield and Brian Jones knocked off his socks in 1965.

Click to watch G.E.'s Rig Rundown.


 

3. Baroness' Gina Gleason on Pantera's "Domination"

The shredder fires through the Dimebag Darrell solo from Cowboys from Hell that first sunk its teeth into her guitar-playing heart.

Click to watch Gina's Rig Rundown.


 

2. John Bohlinger on Dire Straits' "Sultans of Swing"

Our Nashville correspondent explains the debt he owes Mark Knopfler for the inspiration that continues 30 years after first hearing the lively song.

Click to watch John's Rig Rundown.


 

1. Blackberry Smoke's Charlie Starr on ZZ Top's "Nasty Dogs and Funky Kings"

The Southern-rock frontman honors the Texas boogie legends for their 50+ years of "fantastic tone and tasteful playing."

Click to watch Charlie's Rig Rundown.


It’s not difficult to replace the wiring in your pickups, but it takes some finesse. Here’s a step-by-step guide.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. After numerous requests, this month we’ll have a closer look at changing wires on a single-coil pickup. As our guinea pig for this, I chose a standard Stratocaster single-coil, but it’s basically the same on all single-coil pickups and easy to transfer. It’s not complicated but it is a delicate task to not destroy your pickup during this process, and there are some things you should keep in mind.

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The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

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Need an affordable distortion pedal? Look no further.

We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

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