Chicago, IL (May 18, 2010) -- Washburn Guitars has introduced their 40 and 55 acoustic series. Both series feature solid woods and cutaway or non-cutaway options and are the high-end

Chicago, IL (May 18, 2010) -- Washburn Guitars has introduced their 40 and 55 acoustic series. Both series feature solid woods and cutaway or non-cutaway options and are the high-end offering in a number of new acoustic series from Washburn.

The 40 series is available in dreadnought or mini jumbo body styles. The WD40S/WMJ40S and cutaway WD40SCE/WMJ40SCE both have flame maple back and sides, solid spruce top and exclusive gold tuners. A prefix of WD denotes dreadnought body and WMJ denotes a mini jumbo body.



Specs:
  • Quarter-sawn scalloped bracing
  • Flame maple sides and back
  • Satin finished maple neck with two-way truss rod
  • Neck and headstock binding
  • Rosewood fingerboard and bridge with bone nut and saddle.
  • Flame maple capped headstock with abalone Washburn logo & stylized W inlay
  • Gold die-cast chrome tuners
  • MSRP: $712.90

The 55 series features a solid Alaskan sitka top, koa back and sides, abalone binding and rosette and a Fishman tuner/preamp on cutaway electric models. This series is available in dreadnought and grand auditorium body styles.



Specs:
  • Quarter sawn scalloped bracing
  • Koa sides and back
  • Satin finished mahogany neck with two-way trussrod
  • Neck and headstock binding
  • Rosewood fingerboard and bridge with bone nut and saddle
  • Mother-of-pearl Washburn logo & stylized W inlay
  • Gold die-cast chrome tuners
  • MSRP: $801.90 to $944.90
Washburn also came out with lower- and mid-priced series in these lines. The 10, 20, and 30 acoustic series range from $219.90 to $676.90, and the 15, 25, 35 and 45 series range from $479.90 to $874.90.

For more information:
Washburn

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