Rig Rundowns, Gear Reviews, Lessons, Giveaways & More

Flexible filtering options and a vicious fuzz distinguish the Tool bass master’s signature fuzz-wah.

Great quality filters that sound good independently or combined. Retains low end through the filter spectrum. Ability to control wah and switch on fuzz simultaneously. Very solid construction.

Fairly heavy. A bit expensive.

$299

Dunlop JCT95 Justin Chancellor Cry Baby Wah
jimdunlop.com

4.5
4
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Options for self-expression through pedals are almost endless these days. It’s almost hard to imagine a sonic void that can’t be filled by a single pedal or some combination of them. But when I told bass-playing colleagues about the new Dunlop Justin Chancellor Cry Baby—which combines wah and fuzz tuned specifically for bass—the reaction was universal curiosity and marvel. It seems Dunlop is scratching an itch bass players have been feeling for quite some time.

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Mojo Hand FX has unveiled the Sericon, an overdrive pedal with three separate controls for gain manipulation; Drive, Gain, and Blaze.

The Sericon overdrive is an interpretation of the gold standard of overdrives with more gain shaping options than other “Klones”. It has a highly tweak-able, interactive mystique all its own, with three separate controls for gain manipulation; Drive, Gain and Blaze. All types of drive are on tap, ranging from clean always-on boost to edge-of-breakup to all out shred.

Features

  • Controls for 3 stages of gain manipulation: Drive, Gain, and Blaze
  • Post Gain control for treble and level
  • Blaze control is a unique interactive third gain stage affecting low end and mid
  • 9v Standard center negative power supply only (not included), no battery provision
  • True bypass with soft touch silent switching design
  • Individually serial-number plated limited production issue
  • Made in USA, lifetime warranty
  • Dimensions: 4.7” L, 3.69” W, 1.37” H

$199 MAP/ street price. Go to mojohandfx.com for more info.

Sam Fender shares a moment with his saxophonist and childhood friend, Johnny "Blue Hat" Davis, at London's O2 Brixton Academy in September 2021.

Photo by Linda Brindley

The British songwriter traversed the bleak thoroughfares of his past while writing his autobiographical sophomore album, Seventeen Going Under—a tale of growing up down-and-out, set to an epic chorus of Jazzmasters and soaring sax.

British songwriter Sam Fender hails from North Shields, England, an industrial coastal port town near the North Sea, about eight miles northeast of Newcastle upon Tyne. Fender grew up in this small village, which he calls "a drinking town with a fishing problem." He lived there with his mother on a council estate, a type of British public housing. This is the mise-en-scène for Sam Fender's coming-of-age autobiographical new album, Seventeen Going Under. On the album's cover, a photograph shows Sam sitting on a brick stoop.

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