The Wash is aimed at guitarists who typically use multiple delays and reverbs to create lush sounds. “I often see ambient players using two delays and two reverbs at a time to create their ambient wash tone, and I wanted to have
that all in one pedal,” says designer Eric Junge.

Hungry Robot

Hungry Robot Pedals offers deep tones with a streamlined interface. “I try to make the user experience as simple as possible,” says owner Eric Junge. “When you’re onstage, you don’t want a whole bunch of presets and hidden menus. Different parameters are great for the studio, but when it comes to a live setting, you want to focus on your playing and interact with the crowd.”

“When you’re onstage, you don’t want a whole bunch of presets and hidden menus.” —Eric Junge, Hungry Robot Pedals

Junge’s first pedals were overdrives—which he still builds—though lately he’s focused on ambient tones, as evidenced by his biggest seller, the Wash. “I wanted to simplify the ’board for someone who plays ambient stuff,” he says. “I often see ambient players using two delays and two reverbs at a time to create their ambient wash tone, and I wanted to have that all in one pedal. A lot of people mistake the Wash for just a delay and reverb, which it is at its core, but what makes it unique is the way those two interact with each other. There are different types of feedback loops built into the pedal, where the reverb goes back into the delay and that will go through the reverb again and then into a different part of the delay. You can’t do that with patch cables. I also wanted a tap-tempo delay that was able to engage the super lush ambient wash tone underneath the signal.”


Junge builds every Hungry Robot pedal in his basement.

Junge’s pedals don’t use a battery, which seems to be a trend in the industry. “I’ve probably sold close to 1,000 pedals and I’ve only had two people ask about batteries,” he says. “I think the general consensus is most people aren’t using batteries any more. A lot of my designs are very tight internally—I couldn’t even fit a battery into a couple of them. So my take is, ‘Am I going to make this pedal bigger for the 0.1 percent of the public that’s going to use a battery?’”


The Starlite reverb pedal offers tap tempo and modulation.

One tight design is the HG+LG (High Gain plus Low Gain), which consists of two overdrive pedals crammed into a single enclosure. The outside controls are simple, but inside 12 DIP switches let you make subtle changes depending on your guitar and amp combination. “I saw with a lot of different guitarists that the overdrive section of their board was constantly changing,” he says. “They would buy a pedal, play through it for one or two days, and put it up on Reverb.com. I wanted people to be able to customize their drive by tweaking the different diodes, tone signatures, and gains. My hope is that whatever types of guitars and amps they’re using, they’ll find a way to have everything mesh well.”


Junge’s MO is to produce deep tones with a streamlined interface. “When you’re onstage, you don’t want a whole bunch of presets and hidden menus,” he says.

Hungry Robot is a family affair and the pedals are built in-house. “It’s all in my basement right now,” Junge says. “I do all through-hole components—I don’t send it to a board house and have surface mount stuff slapped on there. I wire it all together. I do all the powder coating, all the drilling, all the PCB assembly, and final assembly. Even the artwork, my wife does that.”

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