Warehouse American Vintage G8C

Specs:
18-oz. ceramic magnet
20 watts


Clip 1—Schecter Bridge + Fuzztite & Vibro Champ - Vol, Treble And Bass - Max
Clip 2—Tele Bridge & Vibro Champ - Vol, Treble And Bass - 5
Clip 3—Tele Bridge & Vibro Champ - Vol, Treble And Bass - Max
Clip 4—Tele Bridge + Neck & Vibro Champ - Vol, Treble And Bass - 5
Clip 5—Tele Neck & Vibro Champ - Vol, Treble And Bass - 5


Over the last few years, Kentucky-based Warehouse Guitar Speakers (WGS) has emerged as one of the biggest success stories in the face of longtime industry dominators, offering American- and British-voiced replacement speakers (as well as bass and P.A. designs) that rival the big guns—often at a significantly lower price.

Although the American Vintage G8C reviewed here is Warehouse’s only 8" model, it packs serious punch—especially considering its ultra-reasonable $39 price tag. It sports both a unique, classy aesthetic and super-solid build quality.

How would I describe the G8C’s tones? In a word, rich. In two words, rich and loud—the loudest of this bunch. Might I add fantastically flexible? The “vintage” descriptor gets tossed around rather liberally in the guitar-gear industry, but in the G8C’s case the label really is apt: It sounds broken-in straight out of the gate. Even with the Vibro Champ’s controls maxed and my Tele’s bridge pickup soloed, the WGS went from firm and in control under delicate fingerpicked attack to absolutely raging—in all the right ways—sans icepick-y drawbacks. In the Tele’s middle position, moderate EQ and volume settings yielded remarkably round and characterful tones perfect for old-school R&B and funk. Meanwhile, Tele neck-pickup tones were surprisingly fat, and Jordan Fuzztite-fried TV Jones tones tore out of the G8C without sounding undesirably nasty.

In all, the G8C offers superb enjoyment for at-home playing and, with a quality mic, yields tones so grand that many listeners will balk when told they come from such a small speaker—let alone one that’s brand new.

Ratings

Pros:
Wonderfully responsive to dynamics. Great range of tones—from warm and fat to twangy, chimey, gritty, or nasty and aggressive. Dual wire-lead tabs for each polarity.

Cons:
Can sound slightly mushy when pushed to its limits—though many will consider this a boon, not a shortcoming.

Street:
$39

Warehouse American Vintage G8C
wgs4.com

 

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