Premier Guitar features affiliate links to help support our content. We may earn a commission on any affiliated purchases.

Cling On Introduces Acoustic Guitar Pickup

The pickup works on banjos, ukuleles, cajons, and other acoustic instruments with accessible flat soundboards.

Fullerton, CA (June 1, 2018) -- The Cling On Pickup is a compact and elegant passive piezo pickup with a patented ultra-quick and easy magnetic attachment. It requires absolutely no modification, nor any lengthy installation. The detachable portable cable and a built-in volume control are valuable extra features. Designed primarily for acoustic and classical guitars, the Cling On Pickup works equally well on banjos, ukulele‘s, cajons and other acoustic instruments with accessible flat soundboards.

Features:

  • Ultra quick and easy magnetic attachment. The patented magnetic design allows the pickup to securely attach and detach to the instrument in a fraction of a second. No cumbersome or messy installations necessary.
  • No instrument modification required - There is no need to drill or modify your instrument in any way. There are no permanently attached, glued or screwed-on parts. The Cling On Pickup is “plug and play” ready right out of the box.
  • Natural & balanced sound - The constant magnetic pressure on the soundboard, contributes to more accurate transfer of the vibrations from the soundboard to the pickup. The result is a very natural and balanced sound with high signal output. No pre-amp is required.
  • Discreet placement of magnetic base – Each pickup comes with a very small and very light magnetic base that is attached underneath the soundboard on the inside of the guitar via tacky putty. This ONE-TIME non-permanent discreet installation prepares the instrument for the pickup. It's removable, reusable and can be easily re-positioned.
  • Find the "sweet spot" of your instrument every time. Once the best location on the soundboard is found, the magnetic base stays in place ready for the pickup to dock at the same place every time. There is no more guessing where the sweet spot of your instrument is.
  • Built-in volume control – Unobtrusive thumb wheel volume knob design gives the performer control of the sound level at all times.

The Cling On Pickup can be purchased for $69.99 at www.clingon.co and select music stores.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Cling On Tuner

With a team of experts on hand, we look at six workhorse vintage amps you can still find for around $1,000 or less.

If you survey the gear that shows up on stages and studios for long enough, you’ll spot some patterns in the kinds of guitar amplification players are using. There’s the rotating cast of backline badasses that do the bulk of the work cranking it out every day and night—we’re all looking at you, ’65 Deluxe Reverb reissue.

Read MoreShow less

Amazon Prime Day is here (July 16-17). Whether you're a veteran player or just picking up your first guitar, these are some bargains you don't want to miss. Check out more deals here! https://amzn.to/3LskPRV

Read MoreShow less

A technicolor swirl of distortion, drive, boost, and ferocious fuzz.

Summons a wealth of engaging, and often unique, boost, drive, distortion, and fuzz tones that deviate from common templates. Interactive controls.

Finding just-right tones, while rewarding, might demand patience from less assured and experienced drive-pedal users. Tone control could be more nuanced.

$199

Danelectro Nichols 1966
danelectro.com

4.5
4
4
4.5

The Danelectro Nichols 1966, in spite of its simplicity, feels and sounds like a stompbox people will use in about a million different ways. Its creator, Steve Ridinger, who built the first version as an industrious Angeleno teen in 1966, modestly calls the China-made Nichols 1966 a cross between a fuzz and a distortion. And, at many settings, it is most certainly that.

Read MoreShow less

The author standing next to a Richardson gunstock lathe purchased from Gibson’s Kalamazoo factory. It was used to make six necks at a time at Gibson in the 1950s and 1960s.

Keep your head down and put in the work if you want to succeed in the gear-building business.

The accelerated commodification of musical instruments during the late 20th century conjures up visions of massive factories churning out violins, pianos, and, of course, fretted instruments. Even the venerable builders of the so-called “golden age” were not exactly the boutique luthier shops of our imagination.

Read MoreShow less