Anaheim, CA (Jan 18, 2012) – D’Addario is introducing new additions to two of its most popular lines, the Nylon Tapewound Bass String line and the XL Pure Nickel

Anaheim, CA (Jan 18, 2012) – D’Addario is introducing new additions to two of its most popular lines, the Nylon Tapewound Bass String line and the XL Pure Nickel Electric Guitar String lines, adding a new medium scale to the Nylon Tapewound Bass line and an 8-string set to the XL Pure Nickel Electric Guitar String line.

The Nylon Tapewound Bass Strings are revered by traditional and modern players for their warm “thump” with focused fundamental. Gauge specs are engineered for fit on most basses. Designed to produce a deep, warm tone with smooth feel, D’Addario’s Tapewound Bass strings are wound using a flattened black nylon which is polished to an ultra-smooth finish. These engineered to provide optimal tension and are gauged to fit properly on standard bass saddles and nuts. Tapewounds may be used on fretted or fretless basses and are designed to deliver a vintage tone ranging from the “thump” of an upright bass to the focused depth of traditional flatwound strings.

The new medium scale set will be available in January 2012 and will retail for $62.00.

D’Addario XL Nickel Wound Electric Guitar Strings are “The Player’s Choice” amongst players of all genres and styles. XLs are precision-wound with nickelplated steel on a hex-shaped core, resulting in strings with a distinctive bright tone and excellent intonation. By popular demand, D’Addario will be the offering EXL120-8 8-string guitar set in January 2012. String gauges include: .009, .011, .016, .024, .032, .042, .054, and .065.

This new set, EXL120-8, delivers powerful low end for heavy chording and flexible plain steel strings for bending.

For more information:
www.daddario.com

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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