DigiTech Reissues the DOD Gonkulator

It delivers the clanking, metallic, rasping sonic disorder of the original with a few upgrades.

Salt Lake City, UT (July 11, 2015) -- For players seeking out of the ordinary sounds, your dreams – or maybe your nightmares – have come true: the infamous DOD Gonkulator is back! HARMAN’s DigiTech has updated the DOD Gonkulator Ring Modulator, which delivers all the clanking, metallic, rasping sonic disorder of the original with upgrades like true bypass operation, a 9-volt power supply input and a new adjustable carrier Freq control that allows you to tune the Gonkulator from 90Hz-1.5kHz. The Gonkulator is actually two effects in one – it combines a ring modulator in parallel with a distortion circuit for further sonic perversion. “Ring modulation can create inharmonic overtones, which sound just like what their name implies – edgy, discordant, and jarring. But with the adjustable Freq control, you can also get some very musical textures and overtones,” said Tom Cram, marketing manager, DigiTech. “The Gonkulator also features an aggressive distortion circuit to further mangle your signal. If you’re looking for sweet and subtle, that’s not the Gonk!”

One note from the Gonkulator and you’ll certainly have listeners’ attention. The RING knob determines the amount of the ring modulation signal that is mixed with the clean signal to add those unavailable-anywhere-else “gonk-like” clanging rasping, alien-robot tones to a guitar or instrument’s sound. The DIST and GAIN knobs control the amount of distortion and the blend of the distorted signal. A new feature not found on the original is the FREQ control, which allows the ring modulation to be tuned to be anything from slightly strange to wildly atonal.

The DOD Gonkulator mates all the sonic idiosyncrasies of the original with functional improvements including true bypass operation to preserve the tone of the unaffected signal when the pedal is not engaged, a 9-volt power supply input for a choice of external power or 9-volt battery operation and a bright blue LED indicator that’s visible everywhere from dark stages to bright sunlight. The Gonkulator’s retro-classic graphics and road-tough metal housing reflect its unmistakable DOD lineage.

$187 MSRP

For more information:
DOD

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Beginner

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