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Dunlop Introduces the MXR Reverb

Dunlop Introduces the MXR Reverb

A Phase 90-sized housing with a simple three-knob setup and a hi-fi analog dry path.

Benicia, CA (March 30, 2016) -- The MXR design team is proud to introduce the MXR Reverb, a remarkable achievement that delivers not one but six distinct high end reverbs, each exquisitely crafted and tuned by the same engineers who brought you the Carbon Copy Analog Delay and the Super Badass Distortion. And it all comes in a Phase 90-sized housing with a simple three-knob setup and a hi-fi analog dry path. Each reverb style is as richly detailed as any found in the highest-end rack units and plug-ins, and all you have to do to step through them is push the Tone knob: Plate, Spring, Epic, Mod, Room, and Pad.

The MXR Reverb features an EXP output so you can blend between two different setting configurations. The all-analog dry path boasts a massive 20 volts of headroom—thanks to MXR’s Constant Headroom Technology™—and a choice of relay or trails bypass. The Reverb also includes 100% Wet Mode in addition to stereo input and output capability.

Features:

  • Six meticulously crafted reverbs in one pedal
  • Hi-fi analog and digital audio paths
  • Dry path is 100% analog
  • Studio-grade low noise floor
  • Relay true bypass and delay trails modes
  • Expression pedal jack for foot control of all knob settings
  • Stereo In/Out capability when using TRS cables

Street: $199.99

For more information:
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