The guitar features a Mastery offset M1 bridge and JM-style Mastery MV vibrato.

Los Angeles, CA (December 12, 2014) -- Echopark Guitars has revealed the Model J to the already stunning line of handmade, made in the U.S.A. Guitars. The Model J exemplifies some of the most forgotten, yet sonically inspiring, details in feel and electronics, wood selections, mechanical components and classic design aesthetic.

The complex sonic treasures found within the Arcane Inc. USA/Echopark-designed 'Gold Coil'/J­Master pickup, combined with the brilliantly crafted Mastery offset M1 bridge and JM-style Mastery MV Vibrato, serve to inspire the deepest part of any artist's soul.

From the tones, styles, and overall funkiness found in 60's Japanese Teisco Del Rey guitars to some of the mid '50s prototypes by Southern California's modern guitar pioneers and further back to the early '50s Valco catalog, have all been the consistent muse of luthier Gabriel Currie and his constant guiding light on the journey towards creating his self described “Modern Vintage” instruments.

The Echopark Model J is the actualization of all my quirky and left-of-center muses thrown to the walls. The eclectics in all of us may just discover some new voices to guide us along our path to creation. The possibilities have proven to be endless.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Echopark

On Black Midi's Cavalcade, Geordie Greep’s fretwork is an example of the 6-string as a capable component as much as a solo instrument, never completely stealing the show.

Popular music and mainstream tastes may be more fractured than ever, but the guitar continues to thrive.

As we soft launch into the new year, I’m not waiting for the requisite guitar obituary in the news. It’s not going to happen again anytime soon. Why? Because as far as the mainstream media is concerned, our beloved instrument is not only dead, it's irrelevant to the point of not even being an afterthought. When the New York Times published their most recent albums of the year list, there was barely a guitar-based recording to be found. Still, there is not only hope, but also cause for jubilation.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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