The pedal features nine of the most distinctive vintage-synth type sounds.

New York, NY (February 21, 2017) -- The SYNTH9 Synthesizer Machine emulates classic electronic synthesizers and features nine of the most distinctive vintage-synth type sounds. A nine-position rotary switch allows the user to select from the following: OBX, PROFIT V, VIBE SYNTH, MINI MOOD, EHX MINI, SOLO SYNTH, MOOD BASS, STRING SYNTH and POLY VI.

Using the same innovative technology that powers the award-winning B9 and C9 Organ Machines as well as the KEY9 Electric Piano Machine and MEL9 Tape Replay Machine, the SYNTH9 works on guitar or bass without modifications, special pickups or MIDI implementation. Its usable tracking range extends up to about the 23rd fret on the high-E string of a standard guitar and down to the open A-string on a bass guitar.

The pedal’s elegant user interface features DRY volume, SYNTH volume, CTRL1 and CTRL2 knobs that provide precise control over each preset’s parameters.

Electro-Harmonix Founder, Mike Matthews, stated: “The SYNTH9 may be the greatest member of our 9 Family of pedals yet! From searing lead synths to spacey synth pads and deep, funky synth bass grooves, it’s all accessible.”

The SYNTH9 comes equipped with a standard EHX 9.6DC 200mA power supply, will be available late March and features a U.S. Street Price of $221.30

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

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