In the debut episode of our new video series, Gruhn Guitars' Greg Voros gives us the lowdown on an ultra-rare guitar and amp, while John Bohlinger demos their luscious tones as only he can.

When it comes to vintage guitars, few places on earth can even hope to compete with the expertise and inventory of George Gruhn’s mainstay shop in Nashville. Gruhn's Guide to Vintage Guitars is one of the most referenced books you can find on the subject, and the crew at Gruhn Guitars is second to none at the history, inspection, certification, repair, and upkeep of fine guitars. They’ve also got a pretty stellar collection of vintage amps. So stellar, in fact, that we’ve decided to partner with Gruhn Guitars to give you an opportunity to hear notable guitars and amps from their collection, as played by Premier Guitar’s own John Bohlinger, as well as to learn what makes the rare specimens special from repair shop manager Greg Voros. So without further ado, we give you the debut of our latest video series, Axes & Artifacts.

This 1964 Vibrolux Reverb arrived in all-original condition, right down to a two-prong power cord and a death cap wired to the ground switch. The author’s well-worn Strat is the perfect companion.

How our columnist’s risky purchase turned out to be a dusty pre-CBS jewel.

This month, I’d like to share the story of my 1964 Fender Vibrolux Reverb. It was a really risky purchase that had some big surprises.

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Fat tones from a sweet niche where Les Paul, Gretsch, and Telecaster share the limelight.

Copious, unexpected tones. Cool, useful bass contour control. Very nice build quality. Excellent value.

Heavy.

$1,199

Reverend Flatroc Bigsby
reverendguitars.com

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If you only pay casual attention to Reverend guitars, it’s easy to overlook how different their instruments can be. Some of that may be due to the way Reverends look. There are longstanding styling themes and strong family likenesses among models that can make differentiation a challenge for uninitiated guitar spotters. For instance, the Flatroc reviewed here has more or less the same body as the Charger, Buckshot, and Double Agent OG (which has an entirely different body than the more Jazzmaster-like Double Agent W). If you don’t have an experienced Reverend enthusiast at your side, it can all be a bit mind bending.

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