From EVH to Auerbach, Joe Perry, and Vai—37 Boards You''ll Drool Over.

Steel Dan's Jon Herington
Jon Herington's pedalboard is split into two sections. The first is plugged directly into the front of the Bludotone amp and the second is run through the effects loop. From his guitar he goes into a Boss TU-2 and then to a Xotic RC-Booster which is only used when he is playing his Tele. From there it goes into a Vox Joe Satriani Big Bad Wah and an Ernie Ball mono volume pedal. Next is another Xotic RC-Booster, which he uses as a bass cut for solos on his neck pickup and then to the front of the amp. Out of the effects loop he goes into a Tech 21 Roto Choir, Voodoo Lab Tremolo, Tech 21 Boost D.L.Aпwhich is set to a short delay and left on all the timeпan '80s Ibanez Chorus/Flanger and finally a Boss Digital Reverb RV-5. The black footswitch runs the Bludotone and the Mesa/Boogie footswitch changes channels on the Guytron.

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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