The strings are designed to eliminate harsh overtones and string noise.

Battle Creek, MI (November 28, 2017) -- GHS Strings are delighted to launch their latest exciting development: Pressurewound Bronze strings for the acoustic/electric bass.

Many acoustic/electric bass players know that the traditional bronze strings that come standard on these basses have harsh overtones and a lot of string noise. GHS created the Pressurewound Bronze bass strings to tackle these issues. By rollerwinding the final bronze cover, the string noise is eliminated, leaving you that sparkling acoustic bronze tone without anything extra.

GHS manufactured the Pressurewound Bronze bass strings, using the same construction concepts as the Balanced Nickels and took the final bronze cover and rollerwound it to eliminate any string squeakiness. The result is a set of strings that sound great up and down the board with finger noise eliminated.

The Pressurewound Bronze strings are designed much like the Balanced Nickel bass sets; each string has two covers, wound over a round core. This design also allows the Pressurewound Bronze to be used on an electric bass with magnetic pickups, yielding a smooth, mid-forward sound.

The Pressurewound Bronze are available in a 4-string set (light 42-92) with a single 120 gauge available for 5 string basses.

Watch the company's video demo:

For more information:
GHS Strings

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We’re almost finished with the aging process on our project guitar. Let’s work on the fretboard, nut, and truss rod cover, and prepare the headstock for the last hurrah.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month we’ll continue with our relic’ing project, taking a closer look at the front side of the neck and treating the fretboard and the headstock. We’ll work on the front side of the headstock in the next part, but first we must prepare it.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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