Retailers required to remove paper guitars from store shelves immediately

Gibson has announced a legal victory in their effort to protect the ownership of some classic guitar shapes. For more information on some of the key issues involved with legally owning various guitar and guitar part designs, click here to read our December 2010 feature story on the subject.

Here is the press release issued by Gibson just moments ago:

Los Angeles, CA (December 22, 2010) -  Gibson Guitar Corp. was granted a request for an injunction against WOWWEE USA Inc, the makers of Paper Jamz, and its retailers, which include Wal-Mart, Amazon.com, Big Lots Stores, K Mart Corporation, Target Corporation, Toys “R” Us- Delaware Inc, Walgreen Co., Brookstone Company, Best Buy Co. Inc, eBay Inc, Toywiz Inc and HSN Inc.

The initial complaint, filed by Gibson Guitar Corp. on November 18, 2010, stated that the WOWWEE USA Inc produced Paper Jamz products wrongfully copy Gibson’s famous guitars, the LES PAUL, FLYING V, EXPLORER and SG.  Gibson states that they intend to remain aggressive in protecting such trademarks, as it relates to its guitar shapes and designs and that it is of the highest priority to protect a consumer’s right to purchase an authentic Gibson guitar, regardless of the form.

The granted injunction indicates that Gibson Guitar Corp. would be irreparably harmed by the continued sale of the products and requires retailers to remove all included Paper Jamz models from their shelves immediately.

Gibson Guitar Corporation, founded in 1994 and Incorporated in 1902, is headquartered in Nashville, TN.  It is the leading maker of acoustic and electric guitars. For more information about its products, please visit gibson.com.

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