The Limited features Robot tuning and new Fireball finish in its 400-piece run.

Nashville, TN (May 7, 2010) -- Gibson has unveiled details of the Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited. The guitar features Robot tuning and the Dark Fire's Master Control Knob that controls the guitar's Hum-Canceling P90H neck pickup, BurstBucker 3 bridge pickup and piezo saddles, and a brand-new Fireball finish. This is what Gibson has to say about the new Les Paul:

Constructed with a Grade-AA flamed maple top, Grade-A chambered mahogany back, and one-piece mahogany neck, the Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited offers classic Les Paul tonewoods, combined with a look that’s exclusive to this run of only 400 guitars.

A unique new Fireball finish with dark ’burst edges graces its top, while its back, neck and sides are dressed in a deep Vintage Sunburst with a dark cherry center and dark edges. Like several of Gibson USA’s models of years past, the Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited’s fast, slim ’60s profiled neck carries a dark Grade-A ebony fingerboard with block inlays, while its headstock wears a chrome truss rod cover and a Les Paul designation. Quite simply, there has never been a Les Paul like it—and once they are gone, there never will be again.

Body and Finish
Crafted along the classic lines of the Les Paul Standard, the Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited has a Grade-AA maple top and chambered Grade-A mahogany back — a legendary partnership in tonewoods — with Gibson’s exclusive Fireball finish on the top and Cherry Vintage Sunburst on the back, neck and sides, all in nitrocellulose lacquer.

Neck and Headstock
The Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited’s neck is constructed from one solid piece of mahogany, cut using the superior quarter-sawn orientation for improved strength and resonance, and glued to the body at the Les Paul’s traditional 5° angle (pitch).

A traditional headstock wears the classic Gibson logo, along with the six Robot Tuners™ that comprise the muscle of its Robot tuning capabilities.

Pickups and Electronics
The Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited’s straightforward looks belie a virtually unlimited tonal palette, accessed via its MCK from a P90H neck pickup, and BurstBucker 3 bridge pickup, and a piezo-saddle bridge.

Routed independently or in myriad combinations, these pickups yield unparalleled sonic versatility, while the user-friendly control array ensures you can access them mid-flight without a single hitch in your performance, even blending in piezo acoustic tones as desired via the rotary potentiometer built into the guitar’s toggle pickup selector switch.

Hardware
The Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited’s hardware includes an upgraded set of components designed for maximum tone and function. Although it looks like the traditional Tune-o-matic model introduced in 1954, its bridge carries individual piezo-pickup-loaded saddles, and is partnered with a new tailpiece engineered for maximum string-to-body coupling.

Topping it all off, six Robot Tuners™ provide the muscle for its Robot automated tuning capabilities. Finally, a pair of locking strap buttons ensure the whole thing stays secure.

All Les Paul Standard 2010 Limited’s include an owner’s manual, two batteries and an independent charger, and come protected in a Limited Edition plush-lined, white, hardshell case with plated emblem. MSRP $6108
For more information:
Gibson

It’s not difficult to replace the wiring in your pickups, but it takes some finesse. Here’s a step-by-step guide.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. After numerous requests, this month we’ll have a closer look at changing wires on a single-coil pickup. As our guinea pig for this, I chose a standard Stratocaster single-coil, but it’s basically the same on all single-coil pickups and easy to transfer. It’s not complicated but it is a delicate task to not destroy your pickup during this process, and there are some things you should keep in mind.

Read More Show less

The emotional wallop of the acoustic guitar sometimes flies under the radar. Even if you mostly play electric, here are some things to consider about unplugging.

I have a love-hate relationship with acoustic guitars. My infatuation with the 6-string really blasted off with the Ventures. That’s the sound I wanted, and the way to get it was powered by electricity. Before I’d even held a guitar, I knew I wanted a Mosrite, which I was sure was made of fiberglass like the surfboards the Beach Boys, Surfaris, and the Challengers rode in their off time. Bristling with space-age switchgear and chrome-plated hardware, those solidbody hotrod guitars were the fighter jets of my musical dreams. I didn’t even know what those old-timey round-hole guitars were called. As the singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autrey strummed off into the sunset, the pace of technology pushed the look and sound of the electric guitar (and bass) into the limelight and into my heart. Imagine my disappointment when I had to begin my guitar tutelage on a rented Gibson “student” acoustic. At least it sort of looked like the ones the Beatles occasionally played. Even so, I couldn’t wait to trade it in.

Read More Show less

Need an affordable distortion pedal? Look no further.

We live in the golden age of boutique pedals that are loaded with advanced features—many of which were nearly unthinkable a decade or so ago. But there’s something that will always be valuable about a rock-solid dirt box that won’t break your wallet. Here’s a collection of old classics and newly designed stomps that cost less than an average concert ticket.

Read More Show less
x