Keeley Electronics Announces the Germanium Super Phat Mod Overdrive

An aggressively voiced overdrive with spongy compression and fuzz.

Edmond, OK (September 7, 2017) -- Keeley Electronics is proud to announce the Germanium Super Phat Mod.

I’ve had the pleasure of modifying this circuit for many years. In 2001 it was the third circuit I modded after the ROSS Compressor and Tube Screamer. It is a wonderfully complex circuit that has many layers of tube amp simulation. It is dynamic and expressive and captures many tones that guitar players love. Fast forward 16 years and we have added a small gain germanium amplifier right after the tone stack to simulate a tube power amp section that has plates so hot they’re almost red. The result is a more aggressively voiced overdrive with spongy compression and fuzz that only germanium transistors give. The 16th Anniversary Edition is hand built with through whole parts and includes a couple visual changes over the regular one. The new badge has sixteen gold bars in the center circle and a germanium transistor badge. The first 100 will be hand signed.

As we we developing this mod over the past couple months we had switched to the Tungsram AC125 germanium transistor as it sounded better for this pedal. We had already printed the new graphics on the cases for this limited run so it was too late to change. Not quite an “Inverted Jenny” but fun to know nonetheless.

Many say the Phat Mod is their favorite tone from a pedal. It’s that natural break-up that just feels good and lets you express yourself. The dynamics make it feel alive and part of your fingers. That’s the reason the modified pedal has stayed on people’s boards for nearly 15 years. The Keeley Super Phat Mod is our famous mod now perfected with amazing sounding JFETs that emulate old tube amps in a unique way. And now it’s even better.

From Robert Keeley: $169?!?! Hand Built?!?! Germanium?!?! Tone as fat and juicy as one of the meals I cook?!?! Yeah, I’m crazy. It’s my way of saying thanks to you for 16 amazing years of working for you. My team and I really love and appreciate you all.

For more information:
Keeley Electronics

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Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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