Godlyke Announces the TWA Triskelion Mk III Harmonic Energizer
Godlyke, Inc. is excited to announce the release of the TWA Triskelion Mk III. The Mk. III combines features of all previous versions of the Triskelion in a smaller, pedalboard-friendly chassis.

The Triskelion is a variable-state bandpass filter with adjustable gain. The filter's "Q" can also be adjusted from very wide to extremely steep to create harmonic focus in a narrow frequency band.

The Triskelion's specially designed filter can create glassy clean tones, boost mids for throaty solos, or tune your rig to any room for walls of singing, resonant feedback. Massive amp sounds, explosive lead-breaks, infinite sustain, and downright nasty, energy-intense tones are just a few of the uses for the Triskelion – the possibilities are limitless.

The Triskelion circuit is based on the uber-rare Systech Harmonic Energizer and has been used by many well-known artists including Dweezil Zappa, Lyle Workman, and Megadeth's Dave Mustaine.

TWA Triskelion® Mk 3 - Harmonic Energizer® Demo (New for 2021!)

Features

  • Amplitude knob adjusts the gain & output level of the pedal
  • Mass knob adjusts the frequency of the filter
  • Energy knob adjusts the Peak or "Q" of the selected frequency
  • Mass Boost switch raises selected frequency band by 1-octave
  • Amplitude on/off switch allows use of pedal as straight EQ or as a Booster/EQ
  • 1/8" external footswitch jack for remote on/off control of Amplitude knob
  • 1/8" TRS Expression pedal input for external control of the filter frequency sweep
  • Ultra-low noise operation
  • 9V battery or external 9 VDC power with low-current draw operation
  • Relay-based True Bypass switching
  • 3-year warranty
  • Made in USA
  • Street Price $229

For more info on TWA products including video demos of the Triskelion Mk III, please visit www.godlyke.com.

For at least a decade, the classic Ampeg SVT was the dominant bass amp for power and tone.

Photo courtesy of ampeg.com

From the giant, hefty beasts of yore to their modern, ultra-portable equivalents, bass amps have come a long way. So, what's next?

Bassists are often quite well-informed about the details of their instruments, down to the finest technical specs. Many of us have had our share of intense discussions about the most minute differences between one instrument and another. (And sometimes those are interrupted by someone saying, "It's all in the fingers.") But right behind our backs, at the end of our output cables, there is a world of tone-shaping that we either simply ignore or just don't want to dive into too deeply. Turning a gear discussion from bass to amp is a perfect way to bring it to an abrupt end.

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Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
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Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.

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