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Godlyke Introduces the TWA Triskelion Mk II

Godlyke Introduces the TWA Triskelion Mk II

The circuit is based on the uber-rare Systech Harmonic Energizer.

Clifton, NJ (November 6, 2015) -- Godlyke, Inc. is proud to announce the release of the TWA TK-02 Triskelion Mk II. The Triskelion is a variable-state bandpass filter with adjustable Gain. The filter’s Q can also be adjusted from very wide to extremely steep to create harmonic focus in a narrow frequency band.

The Triskelion’s specially designed filter can create glassy clean tones, boost midrange for throaty solos, or tune your rig to any room for a wall of singing, resonant feedback. Massive amp sounds, explosive lead-breaks, infinite sustain, and downright nasty, energy-intense tones are just a few of the uses for the Triskelion – the possibilities are limitless.

The Triskelion circuit is based on the uber-rare Systech Harmonic Energizer which was used by several well-known artists including Jim Walsh, Greg Lake and Frank Zappa. Frank’s son Dweezil has been known to use as many as three TWA Triskelion’s in his touring rig.

Features:

  • Amplitude adjusts the Gain & output level of the pedal
  • Variant Mass adjusts the frequency of the filter
  • Energy adjusts the Peak or “Q” of the selected frequency
  • Energize footswitch turns Amplitude control on/off
  • Internal Classic/Modern DIP switch selects between two filter frequency ranges
  • Internal Gain DIP switch reduces Gain for additional headroom
  • Expression pedal input for outboard control of filter frequency
  • External 9 VDC power required (no battery option)
  • Proprietary S3 “Shortest Send Switching” relay-based True Bypass switching
  • 3-year warranty
  • Made in USA

$229 street

For more information:
Godlyke

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