Presonus Releases Capture for iPad and Capture Duo

Capture for iPad can record up to 32 tracks simultaneously, with up to 24-bit, 96 kHz fidelity.

Baton Rouge, LA (July 17, 2014) -- PreSonus has introduced Capture for iPad and Capture Duo, two new audio-recording apps for Apple iPad that are based on the company's lauded Capture live-recording software for StudioLive mixers.

Capture for iPad can record up to 32 tracks simultaneously, with up to 24-bit, 96 kHz fidelity. The app provides basic mixing and editing features. Free Capture Duo lets you record and play two stereo tracks and is otherwise identical to Capture for iPad.

With either app, you can record and save multiple songs on an iPad, then wirelessly transfer them directly to PreSonus Studio One (Mac or PC, version 2.6.3 or later), where you can edit and mix. Songs and individual tracks can also be copied using iTunes if the iPad is connected to the computer with a USB cable.

Capture for iPad has a lean and easy-to-use design: When you create a new Session, all tracks are record-enabled automatically; just tap the Record button to start recording. Tapping the "?" button launches an interactive Quick Start Guide that shows you how to get around the app and how to transfer sessions to Studio One.

Although designed primarily for sound acquisition, Capture for iPad/Duo supports essential event editing for basic cleanup. Editing audio is simple and intuitive, using basic finger gestures. Recordings are saved in the compact Apple Lossless format to save iPad memory and reduce transfer times.

The two apps require a second-generation iPad or newer, iPad Air, or iPad Mini; iOS 7 or higher; and any iPad-compatible audio interface, including the built-in microphone.

Capture for iPad is available from the Apple App Store for an expected price of $9.99. Capture Duo is free from the Apple App Store.

For more information:
Presonus

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