Reverend Announces the Mike Watt Signature Model Wattplower

A 30” scale bass with a smaller body that echoes a short-scale vintage model.

Toledo, OH (January 19, 2017) -- It all started for Mike Watt in San Pedro, California. That’s where he met D. Boon and George Hurley – who would later form The Minutemen – a band that would inspire legions. Watt went on to form fIREHOSE and to play bass for punk royalty, The Stooges, as well as hundreds of solo projects with musicians around the world. He has collaborated with everyone from Henry Rollins and Eddie Vedder to Blue Oyster Cult’s Richard Meltzer to Kelly Clarkson. He wrote a rock opera based on the works of painter Hieronymus Bosch, and he hosts an internet radio show called “The Watt from Pedro Show.” It’s no wonder that he’s Bass Player Magazine’s Lifetime Achievement Award Winner and that CMJ Music called him a “seminal post-punk bass player.”

The Reverend Mike Watt Signature Wattplower is the result of a four-year exploratory between Watt and Reverend to produce a bass guitar with the perfect balance of sonic explosiveness, supreme playability, and ultimately looks uniquely Watt.

The Reverend Mike Watt Signature Model Wattplower is a 30” scale bass with a smaller body that echo the short scale vintage basses that Watt gravitated towards. He was always modifying the vintage basses, so Joe Naylor built the Wattplower with all of his favorite mods on board, some of which are: an adjustable Hipshot A Style bridge, a brass bridge spacer for sustain and balance, and a front mounted output jack with an oversized, heavy-duty jackplate. On the fretboard, there are extra dots at the fifth and twelfth frets for increased positional visibility, with an anchor inlay at the first fret and “wattplower” at the seventeenth. Luminlay dots are on the side of the neck that glow in the dark to help with excellent visibility on poorly lit stages. All of that comes in Satin Powder Yellow or Satin Emerald Green – all very Watt.

You can’t be different if you’re playing what everyone else is. Visit www.reverendguitars.com to start your journey towards being an individual.

For more information:
Reverend Guitars

A lot of you have been waiting for this penultimate step of our guitar aging project, so let’s do some damage!

Welcome back to Mod Garage. Today we’ll continue to work on our aging project, and some of you might be wondering why there was such a long break. The reason is simple: suboptimal timing from my side. The last part of this column was in the middle of autumn, and I wanted you to do the following steps outside (if possible) and not on the kitchen table. Wintertime is not the best time for such a challenge but now is a good starting point, so let’s go!

Read MoreShow less

See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

Luthier Dave Helmer shows you how to cure buzzy strings, bad intonation, gnarly frets, high action, and other common troubles with off-the-shelf axes.

Guitars are the best. We love them. It’s fun to fall in love with a guitar at a store, buy it, and proudly bring it home. But we’ve all been there … where after a month that new guitar is just not playing as good as it was before. As guitar players, we know what feels good and what feels bad when it comes to playability. Maybe you have setup preferences that you like on all your guitars, or maybe you want to experiment with changes to your setup?

Read MoreShow less
x