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Reverend Guitars Introduces the Stu D Baker Electric Guitar

Reverend Guitars Introduces the Stu D Baker Electric Guitar

Livonia, MI (January 15, 2012) – Reverend Guitars took the bats and sideburns off of the Unknown Hinson Signature Model, took it out of the Coffin case, and came

Livonia, MI (January 15, 2012) – Reverend Guitars took the bats and sideburns off of the Unknown Hinson Signature Model, took it out of the Coffin case, and came up the Stu D Baker. The semi-hollow guitar ranges from Country Twang to Classic Rock.

Ten percent smaller than our regular Club King, the Stu D Baker has a full length center block, a 24 3/4” scale neck, two Reverend CP-90s, and the classic Reverend Bass Contour. The result is a thicker tone, more aggressive attack, and increased clarity – a guitar that’s perfect for some serious playing. Midnight Black and a maple neck complete the model.

Like all Reverends, the Stu D Baker has a Korina body for consistency and clarity, pin-lock tuners, and the exclusive Reverend Bass Contour, which adjusts the low frequencies in the same way that the tone control adjusts the highs.

For more information:
www.reverendguitars.com

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