Rotosound Launches British Steel Strings

The classic strings from the ''60s used by Jimi Hendrix, Pete Townsend and Brian May are back

Kent, UK (August 26, 2009) -- Rotosound announces the launch of British Steels, based on the original classic Rotosound Stainless Steel Electric Guitar Strings from the 1960s, now manufactured using improved processes and materials.

Their original stainless steel strings already have a pedigree second to none and were used by Jimi Hendrix, Pete Townsend, Brian May and many others. Rotosounds stainless steel strings offered a clear, bright punchy sound, positive grip, plenty of twang and went on to be played on some of the greatest songs of all time.

The new Rotosound British Steels have been designed to give a brilliant tone, sustain and great volume. Using the very best stainless steel with the highest possible iron content (for better magnetic properties), the new strings are now manufactured under even tighter quality control and stricter tolerances to ensure consistency, clarity and durability.

British Steels are available in the following gauges*:
BS09 09 / 11 / 16 / 24w / 32w / 42w
BS10 10 / 13 / 17 / 26w / 36w / 46w
BS11 11 / 14 / 18 / 28w / 38w / 48w

*w denotes wound string

For more information:
Rotosound

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