The Blackjack AXT Solo-6 features Seymour Duncan blackouts and minimalist appointments.

Los Angeles, CA (March 2, 2010) -- Schecter Guitars has added a single-cut option to their minimalist Blackjack AXT series. This is what the company had to say about the addition:


For no frills reckless abandoned, Schecter’s Blackjack ATX Solo-6 addition rounds out an already small grouping of reclusive siblings packing serious aggression.

The heavy metal purist will find the pair of Seymour Duncan Active Blackouts as the prominent standout on this heavily subdued Mahogany body at 25.5” scale. A 3-piece Mahogany neck is set in with Schecter’s Ultra Access for nailing the 24X Jumbo Frets on Ebony.

You won’t find any fame seeking inlays other than an electric active symbol placed at the 12th fret with an understated Aged Multi-Ply binding. Straight up features continue with a TonePros TOM w/Thru-Body bridge system and easy to utilize Volume/Volume/Tone controls give the modern player the freedom to concentrate on playing. Hardware follows suit in Black Chrome and it’s all locked up with Schecter Locking Tuners.

Available in Aged Black Satin (ABSN) or Aged White (AWHT) for $1069 MSRP.

For more information:
Schecter Guitars

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