Niles, IL (July 10, 2009) -- Shure is now shipping the X2u XLR-to-USB Signal Adapter, available by itself or in bundles with either the SM57 or SM58 microphones. The X2u

Niles, IL (July 10, 2009) -- Shure is now shipping the X2u XLR-to-USB Signal Adapter, available by itself or in bundles with either the SM57 or SM58 microphones.

The X2u Adapter is a modular accessory that connects any XLR microphone to a computer to create quality recordings. The X2u mimics the sleek design of Shure’s popular SM57 and SM58 microphones and can be used for both live and in-studio recording.

The X2u features:
• USB Plug and Play” Connectivity: Enables the convenience of digital recording, anywhere your computer can go (compatible with Windows Vista, XP, 2000, and Mac OS X 10.1 or above).
• Integrated pre-amp with Microphone Gain Control: Allows precise control of input signal level to prevent overload of the analog-to-digital converter.
• Zero Latency Monitoring: Enables real-time playback and facilitates multi-tracking with no disorientating echo.
• Headphone Jack: For monitoring with standard 1/8” connectivity.
• Monitor Mix Control: For blending microphone and playback audio.
• 48-volt Phantom Power: For compatibility with all condenser microphones.

Pricing and Availability:
• X2u Adapter: $129.00 retail [$154.00 MSRP]
• SM58/X2u Bundle: $199.00 retail [$298.00 MSRP]
• SM57/X2u Bundle: $199.00 retail [$298.00 MSRP]

The X2u Signal Adapter carries a two-year limited warranty and can be purchased at select retail partners or online at shure.com.

For more info, visit shure.com.

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