modding

Courtesy of SINGLECOIL (www.singlecoil.com)

Fig. 1

Let’s go under the hood of these legendary rockabilly machines and explore different ways to enhance a passive guitar system.

Welcome back to Mod Garage. Before we start, some good news! After finishing the relic’ing series, I was able to raise $650 from our Harley Benton guinea-pig guitar in an auction. The money went to our local animal shelter for cats and dogs, to help pay some vet bills.

Read More Show less

Image 1 — How to Get the Most out of Hum-Sing-Hum Wiring

Schematic courtesy of singlecoil.com

This circuit lets you get HSH and SSS-like tones from a single guitar.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. Today we'll talk about HSH wiring in general and how to get the best out of it. In general, an HSH configuration means that you have three pickups on your guitar: a bridge humbucker, a middle single-coil, and a neck humbucker. This configuration was very popular in the so-called “super-strat" era, but is still used today, even if you don't see it as often. Almost every manufacturer has at least one or more HSH models in its portfolio, from Ibanez to Suhr, Charvel, Fender, and PRS to Framus, just to name a few. So, I think it's worth taking a closer look at this special configuration, its possibilities, and its downsides.

Read More Show less

Stratocaster

Photo by Seth Reese on Unsplash

Want a vast sonic palette at your fingertips? Here’s a way to get 10 unique sounds from one guitar.

Exactly 10 years ago, I wrote my first column for the publication that evolved into Premier Guitar, and as you can imagine, this is a landmark for me. To celebrate this decennial anniversary, I've cooked up something special. Fair warning: This is a complex mod, so it may not be for everyone. But even though the wiring resembles a circuit from the Apollo 12 mission, it's worth the work if you dream of having a vast sonic palette at your fingertips. The goal of this wiring is to create two independent switching stages: a standard Stratocaster setup mated with a typical PRS scheme. This “Strat-PRS crossover" will give you the best of both worlds in one guitar.

Read More Show less