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TC Electronic G Major 2

TC Electronic announces G-Major 2, a guitar multi-effects processor which heralds a new era of rack-based effects. G-Major 2 is based on the highly acclaimed G-Major platform, but offers new and updated effects and features. G-Major 2 houses effects ranging from delays, reverbs and modulation that helped define the industry. It boasts all-new takes on Tri-chorus, through-zero-flanger, modulated delays and Univibe, each created with impeccable TC Electronic quality. G-Major 2 dynamic controls include Noise Gate, EQ and Compression blocks. G-Major 2 retails at $695 and will ship February 2009. All reverbs found in G-Major 2 are classic TC Electronic reverbs, which have been retuned specifically for guitar. Anew addition is a whole new filter/wah block, ported 1:1 from TC Electronic?s flagship guitar effects unit: G-System. Rounding out the extensive feature set are intelligent pitch shifting and reverse delay. G-Major 2 offers extensive control options and enables users to change patches and presets through MIDI, or to use G-Major 2 in ?stompbox?-mode, enabling on/off switching of individual effects. G-Major 2 also features relay switching options, allowing users to switch their amp channels directly from G-Major 2. G-Major 2 offers users added control through its three different routings of the 6 effect blocks. G-Major 2 offers Serial Routing - where all blocks are lined as a straight line of pedals. The second option is Semi-Parallel - where Delay and Reverb are placed in parallel and finally Parallel - where all blocks except Compression and filter MOD blocks are placed in serial. G-Major 2 offers users easy and convenient editing and storing of patches and pre-sets through a PC/Mac editor available from https://www.tcelectronic.com/G-major2 at the launch of G-Major 2. G-Major 2 encompasses all the classic TC Electronic effects that made G-Major a favorite among passionate hobby musicians and pros alike and, using feedback and requests from dedicated users of the G-Major platform, adds new effects and features, making G-Major 2 the perfect amalgam of tried and true and innovation.



TC Electronic announces G-Major 2, a guitar multi-effects processor which heralds a new era of rack-based effects. G-Major 2 is based on the highly acclaimed G-Major platform, but offers new and updated effects and features. G-Major 2 houses effects ranging from delays, reverbs and modulation that helped define the industry. It boasts all-new takes on Tri-chorus, through-zero-flanger, modulated delays and Univibe, each created with impeccable TC Electronic quality. G-Major 2 dynamic controls include Noise Gate, EQ and Compression blocks. G-Major 2 retails at $695 and will ship February 2009.

All reverbs found in G-Major 2 are classic TC Electronic reverbs, which have been retuned specifically for guitar. Anew addition is a whole new filter/wah block, ported 1:1 from TC Electronic?s flagship guitar effects unit: G-System. Rounding out the extensive feature set are intelligent pitch shifting and reverse delay.

G-Major 2 offers extensive control options and enables users to change patches and presets through MIDI, or to use G-Major 2 in ?stompbox?-mode, enabling on/off switching of individual effects. G-Major 2 also features relay switching options, allowing users to switch their amp channels directly from G-Major 2.

G-Major 2 offers users added control through its three different routings of the 6 effect blocks. G-Major 2 offers Serial Routing - where all blocks are lined as a straight line of pedals. The second option is Semi-Parallel - where Delay and Reverb are placed in parallel and finally Parallel - where all blocks except Compression and filter MOD blocks are placed in serial. G-Major 2 offers users easy and convenient editing and storing of patches and pre-sets through a PC/Mac editor available from https://www.tcelectronic.com/G-major2 at the launch of G-Major 2.

G-Major 2 encompasses all the classic TC Electronic effects that made G-Major a favorite among passionate hobby musicians and pros alike and, using feedback and requests from dedicated users of the G-Major platform, adds new effects and features, making G-Major 2 the perfect amalgam of tried and true and innovation.

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Danelectro Nichols 1966
danelectro.com

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The Danelectro Nichols 1966, in spite of its simplicity, feels and sounds like a stompbox people will use in about a million different ways. Its creator, Steve Ridinger, who built the first version as an industrious Angeleno teen in 1966, modestly calls the China-made Nichols 1966 a cross between a fuzz and a distortion. And, at many settings, it is most certainly that.

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The accelerated commodification of musical instruments during the late 20th century conjures up visions of massive factories churning out violins, pianos, and, of course, fretted instruments. Even the venerable builders of the so-called “golden age” were not exactly the boutique luthier shops of our imagination.

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