Dunlop Expands Primetone Sculpted Plectra Line of Picks

The classic Jazz III and Small-Tri shapes are now available.

Benicia, CA (February 25, 2015) -- Last year, Dunlop released Primetone Sculpted Plectra, premium picks with sculpted, hand-burnished edges, to wide acclaim across genres and playing styles.

By popular demand, we’re expanding the line of Standard, Triangle, and Semi-Round shapes with two new shapes and an additional 1.5 Semi-Round gauge. The two new shapes are the Jazz III, famous for its speed, precision, and articulation, and the Small Tri—available in three gauges, which provides additional playing comfort and control.

Dunlop’s new Primetone Sculpted Plectra will glide off your strings and bring out the true voice and clarity of your instrument. With hand-burnished sculpted edges, these picks allow for fast, articulate runs and effortless strumming. Made from Ultex® for maximum durability and superior tonal definition. Available in a variety of shapes and gauges, each with a low-profile grip or a smooth traditional surface.

MSRP: $8.42 (Player's Pack - 3 Picks EA)

Features:

  • Hand-burnished sculpted edges
  • Made from Ultex for durability and a bright, clear sound
  • Now available in five different shapes, including new shapes Jazz III and Small Tri with a low-profile grip or a smooth traditional surface
  • Semi-Round now available in 1.5mm gauge

For more information:
Jim Dunlop

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