Electroplex to Debut EL34-Powered Rocket 50-EL

The Rocket 50-EL retains all of the performance and features that have made the venerable Rocket 50 the amp of choice for performing guitarists worldwide, and adds the authoritative punch and distinctly “British” character of EL34 power tubes.

Fullerton, CA (December 21, 2010) -- Electroplex Amplifiers will debut the Rocket 50-EL at the 2011 Winter NAMM Show in Anaheim, CA. The Rocket 50-EL retains all of the performance and features that have made the venerable Rocket 50 the amp of choice for performing guitarists worldwide, and adds the authoritative punch and distinctly “British” character of EL34 power tubes.

Beginning with early Marshall and Hiwatt amps and others from the UK, EL34-powered amplifiers have established a unique character and powerful presence favored by guitarists seeking the hard-driving “second-generation” British sound of Jimi Hendrix, Pete Townsend, Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton and many other rock guitar icons of the ‘60s through the ‘90s.

The Rocket 50-EL honors that EL34 tradition and extends it with the versatile front-end voicing of the Rocket 50 preamp. Two distinctly different channels offer a wide array of tone colors, and the Rocket’s expanded gain control allows players to precisely tailor the amount of overdrive in their sound, as well as the overdrive threshold for expressive touch control. The result is a new-generation EL34 amplifier that brings exciting new voices and capabilities to the performance stage and recording studio.

The Rocket 50-EL will be available in head/cab configurations and in multiple combo configurations, starting February, 2011. NAMM Show attendees can try out the Rocket 50-EL at the JHS booth #1212 in Hall E.

For more information:
Electroplex

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