Markneukirchen, Germany (April 17, 2010) -- The new Framus Panthera Supreme combines traditional elements with contemporary details and ergonomic design. The mahogany body and set mahogany neck provide powerful and

Markneukirchen, Germany (April 17, 2010) -- The new Framus Panthera Supreme combines traditional elements with contemporary details and ergonomic design. The mahogany body and set mahogany neck provide powerful and rich sustain and a AAA flamed maple top provides crisp brilliance and eye-catching beauty. An arched top, ergonomically rounded edges on the body and easy access to the upper registers make the Panthera Supreme play like a dream. Two Seymour Duncan pickups, a SH-1 ’59 model (neck) and a SH-14 Custom 5 (bridge) are a classic, yet versatile set of humbuckers that feature a coil tap for single coil mode. The bridge is a TonePros tune-o-matic tailpiece.



Available as right or left handed versions at no additional cost.

Specs:
- Set neck
- Available as right or left handed versions at no additional cost
- Mahogany body with arched AAA flamed maple top
- Mahogany neck
- Tiger stripe ebony fingerboard
- Oval Framus inlays
- Scale: 24.75“ (628 mm)
- Nut width: 43 mm
- 22 medium standard frets
- Plek technology used for guitar setup
- Original Seymour Duncan pickups: SH-1 ’59 (neck), SH-14 Custom 5 (bridge)
- 3-way switch
- 1 x volume control
- 1 x push/pull tone control for humbucker splitting
- Finish: high gloss top with satin back and neck, or high gloss top with high gloss natural finish for back and neck
- Framus locking tuners
- TonePros tune-o-matic bridge
- Warwick Security Locks
- Chrome hardware
- Low-friction Framus nut
- Strings: Framus .010“ - .046“
- Includes Framus “User Kit“
- Includes RockCase Flight Case

For more information:
Framus

This rare English Tonemaster was made circa 1957.

The Valco-produced English Tonemaster is a rare, lap-steel-inspired gem from the 1950s—when genres and guitar design were fluid.

The 1950s were a peculiar time for the electric guitar. Innovators, designers, and tinkerers were pushing the boundaries of the instrument, while musicians were experimenting with various playing techniques and sounds. There was an evolution of sorts (or de-evolution, depending on your slant) from solidbody “sit-down” guitars, like pedal and lap steels, to “stand-up” or “upright” solidbody electrics. If you look at an early Fender catalog—let’s say from 1953—you’ll see the Telecaster (and Esquire), the Precision Bass, and then a whole bunch of steel guitars. There was a shift underway, and many manufacturers began to blur the lines of what a guitar should look, sound, and play like.

Read More Show less

PRS Guitars and John Mayer officially announce the PRS SE Silver Sky, an affordable version of the original with PRS trademark bird inlays and three single-coil pickups.

Read More Show less
x