Carlino Korina Impulse and Identity

Infatuated with the famous Modernistic Korina solidbodies of the late 1950s, Eddie Carlino wanted to add a modern flair to classic specs, and bring it back 50 years later.

Infatuated with the famous Modernistic Korina solidbodies of the late 1950s, Eddie Carlino wanted to add a modern flair to classic specs, and bring it back 50 years later. The 9.5 lb Identity (top right) and the 8.5 lb Impuse (bottom right) are available in a limited run of 25 guitars each. Both guitars feature natural-finish Korina body, two-piece Korina V/C-shaped neck, ebony fingerboard, pearl dot inlays and smooth, rounded fingerboard edges, nicely shaped medium-jumbo frets and a classic 24.75" scale. They’re equipped with Wilkinson tuners, Seymour Duncan SH-6 Distortion pickups, Master Volume, Master Tone, Eck Lo-Fi Booster, 3-position pickup selector, and TonePros Tune-O-Matic bridge with either stoptail or string-through offset V tailpiece of triple-plated solid brass. Control cavities feature threaded metal inserts, battery driveway and a laser-etched control diagram on the inner backplate. A crocodile tolex, form-fit hard case is included, as well as a signed certificate of authenticity. $0 $0 Carlino is building one of each of these guitars right now for Rick Nielson of Cheap Trick, who will be playing them on the new tour starting in June. Nielson already has one Identity in tobacco sunburst with a flamed maple top. $0 $0 Street $3499 $0 carlinoguitars.com

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