This painstaking clone of Mosrite’s late-’60s silicon Fuzzrite has something for tone freaks and trad-minded players alike.


The Jordan Fuzztite is Mahoney Guitar Gear's take on the rare late-’60s Mosrite Fuzzrite—specifically, the silicon-based versions made after the first 250 germanium units. Like the original, it has volume and depth controls, while an added toggle boosts volume and frequency girth in its up position by removing a 22k filter resistor from the circuit.

Players tired of Fuzz Face, Muff, and Fuzz Factory clones will love that the Fuzztite avails a variety of fizzing, trebly, mid-sculpted tones that sound like furious bees wielding an ear probe outfitted with shorting-out electrodes, especially in the low-gain original mode. Unity gain is achieved with volume just past 1 o’clock in low-gain mode, but push volume and depth past noon in high-gain mode and you get furry rotundness and even quasi Octavia sounds that should appeal to fans of more conventional fuzz fare. Some tone weirdoes may lament that most of the wonderful and disgustingly din-piercing sounds require careful lowering of your guitar’s volume knob, while others will shrug that off as merely part of the fuzz game.

Test Gear: Eastwood Sidejack Baritone DLX with Manlius Goatmaster pickups, Squier Classic Vibe 1950s Tele with Nordstrand AVT A3 pickups, Reverend Descent H90 Baritone, Jaguar HC50 and Goodsell Valpreaux 21 combos

Ratings

Pros:
Authentic Mosrite Fuzzrite sounds at a fraction of the size and price. Surprisingly diverse tones via minimal control set.

Cons:
The sickest tones aren’t just a footswitch away—guitar-volume tweaks are a must.

Street:
$125

Company
mahoneyguitargear.com

Tones:

Ease of Use:

Build/Design:

Value:

Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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