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GALLERY: Guitar Heroes - Legendary Craftsmen from Italy to New York

Guitars from D’Angelico, D’Aquisto, Monteleone, and Italian craftsmen featured in The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Guitar Heroes Exhibit. Photos courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

John DуAngelico, 1942
"John DуAngelico in his workshop at 40 Kenmare Street, New York, New York. DуAngelico began working in his uncleуs, Ralph Cianci, shop at age 9. He opened his own shop in 1932, the same year he built his first known archtop guitar. "

Bassist Sebastian Steinberg’s credits range from deep-cut avant-jazz to the highest levels of pop stardom.

The low-end groove-master—who’s worked with Soul Coughing, Fiona Apple, and Iron & Wine—shares some doses of wisdom.

Umpty-ump years ago, at the beginning of my music magazine career, I conducted my first ever interview. It was with bassist Sebastian Steinberg of Soul Coughing, and I was excited to be talking to half of the rhythm section powerhouse behind this avant-rock, sounds-like-nothing-else quartet.

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Steve Carr’s first amp build was a Fender Champ clone. It didn’t work on the first try. Luckily, that didn’t stop him.

Photo by Charles Odell

The North Carolina amp builder is famous for his circuit-blending soundboxes, like the Rambler, Sportsman, and Telstar. Here, he tells us how he got started and what keeps him pushing forward.

Steve Carr started building amps because he loved playing guitar. He and his friends cobbled together a band in Michigan City, Indiana, in high school in the mid-’70s, and the gear they played with seemed like a black box. In the pre-internet days, getting information on amp voicings and pickup magnets was difficult. Carr was fascinated, and always wanted to know what made things tick.

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Over the course of his long career, the Rush guitarist has shape-shifted through the classic rock universe. From mid-’70s hard rock through the band’s more progressive tendencies, into the beating heart of the ’80s, and finding a (relatively) leaner approach by the turn of the century, Lifeson—aka Lerxst—always found a new way to add space and dimension to Rush’s dense sound. Lifeson’s unique lead and rhythm playing has been celebrated with a range of signature gear that speaks to his broad sonic palette.

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Yungblud's first signature features a mahogany body, P-90 Pro pickup, and SlimTaper C profile neck.

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