He fronts two menacing bands with his “Ferrari-like” signature Jackson, but he’s also got a soft spot for his vintage ES-335.

Facing a mandatory shelter-in-place ordinance to limit the spread of COVID-19, PG enacted a hybrid approach to filming and producing Rig Rundowns. This is the 18th video in that format, and we stand behind the final product.

Dave Davidson graduated from Berklee in 2008 and quickly began turning heads and breaking necks with the brutal death metal band Revocation. As the primary songwriter, composer, singer, and lead guitarist, Davidson has taken Revocation far beyond guttural growls, bludgeoning blast beats, and rapid-fire soloing. His scholastic focus on polyrhythms and jazz has continually seeped into the band’s thrashy spine over the course of seven full-length records and two EPs. Furthering the band’s musicality is the coalescing of his expertise and enthusiasm for dynamics by incorporating dissonant chords, fusion runs, and funky colorings.

And earlier this year, before the world shut down, Davidson revealed a new facet to his artistic expression by unveiling Gargoyl—a haunting, grunge-influenced prog-rock band. Think Yes meets Alice in Chains. In addition to pursuing both bands, Davidson is getting back to teaching, both on a 1-on-1 level and holding workshops at his alma mater.

Just after launching his new website (davedavidsonguitar.com) and before releasing Gargoyl’s self-titled debut album on October 9, Davidson virtually welcomed PG’s Chris Kies into his New England-based jam space. The technically-proficient shredder (and jazz cat) opens up about personalizing the Jackson Warrior for his signature model, reducing the fire in his humbuckers for a more all-around, versatile pickup set, and condensing his pedalboard by codesigning a “solo” stomp.


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Rig Rundown: Adam Shoenfeld

Whether in the studio or on his solo gigs, the Nashville session-guitar star holds a lotta cards, with guitars and amps for everything he’s dealt.

Adam Shoenfeld has helped shape the tone of modern country guitar. How? Well, the Nashville-based session star, producer, and frontman has played on hundreds of albums and 45 No. 1 country hits, starting with Jason Aldean’s “Hicktown,” since 2005. Plus, he’s found time for several bands of his own as well as the first studio album under his own name, All the Birds Sing, which drops January 28.

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Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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