Seymour Duncan Releases the Black Winter Pickup

Seymour Duncan announced a pickup aimed at extreme metal guitarists.

Santa Barbara, CA (July 2, 2013) -- The winters in Scandinavia are dark, just like the metal that comes out of that part of the world. And sometimes, in capturing a tone suitable for such blackness, guitarists need something with even more grime and aggression; the right balance of mids, treble and bass to instantly go from annihilating riffs to articulately cutting solos. Three ceramic magnets and a special wind produce a distortion that is crushing with aggressive saturation in the mids and high-end.

Black Winter was initially developed for the extreme metal players of Scandinavia and made available in January of this year. Due to an upswell of calls for its full release, you'll now be able to get Black Winter at your local music store or favorite online dealer. Black Winter's look matches its dark intentions: a black bottom plate, black pole pieces and screws, red wire, and the Seymour Duncan logo in Old English font.

Available for 6-string guitars, you'll be able to get Black Winter in either a bridge or neck version or as a complete calibrated set. For those whose guitar has a tremolo, you'll also be able to get Black Winter in a Trembucker version for maximum balance.

Bridge or Neck: Street $89.95
Set: Street $179.95

For more information:
Seymour Duncan

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